Parenting in chronic, life limiting and life threatening paediatric illness: Investigating parenting strategies and the utility of a supportive parenting intervention.

UoM administered thesis: Doctor of Clinical Psychology

  • Authors:
  • Katie Swift

Abstract

AbstractThe University of ManchesterCandidate: Katie Swift A thesis submitted to The University of Manchester for the degree of ClinPsyD in the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and HealthThesis title: Parenting in chronic, life limiting and life threatening paediatric illness: Investigating parenting strategies and the utility of a supportive parenting intervention.2016This thesis explored the challenges of parenting a child with a chronic, life threatening or life limiting illness and the psychological sequelae for both parent and child. Parenting is a challenging and rewarding role, which can be significantly affected when children are diagnosed with life altering conditions. Parenting through a child's illness can have a significant impact on the child's quality of life and emotional and behavioural adjustment and thus the strategies parents use are paramount for overall wellbeing. Paper one provides a systematic review of the literature to better understand the strategies used by parents of children with chronic or life limiting/threatening illness to help inform effective supportive interventions. The review of 32 papers, highlighted how the intricacies of each illness impact parent's strategy usage. Furthermore, strategies often considered negative were found to have utility within illness populations. The review provides an understanding of the difference between parental strategy and style and provides recommendations for clinicians and researchers for future research.Paper two details a feasibility study to explore recruitment and retention to a parenting intervention via web based advertising for parents of children with a diagnosis of cancer. Case series methodology was utilised to assess the feasibility of a Triple P Positive Parenting Program, with the primary aim of improving children's quality of life. A total of four mothers of children aged 4-7 years old completed multiple baseline and data points over the course of the intervention. The results showed some impact on quality of life, reductions in child behavioural difficulties and improvements in parental experience of their child's illness, demonstrating promise for this intervention in a cancer population. Paper three provides a critical reflection of the research process, specifically providing the strengths and limitations of papers one and two and personal reflections.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
Supervisors/Advisors
Award date1 Aug 2017