Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort.Citation formats

  • Authors:
  • P E Martin
  • J K Eckert
  • J J Koplin
  • A J Lowe
  • L C Gurrin
  • And 7 others
  • External authors:
  • S C Dharmage
  • P Vuillermin
  • M L K Tang
  • A-L Ponsonby
  • M Matheson
  • D J Hill
  • K J Allen

Standard

Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort. / Martin, P E; Eckert, J K; Koplin, J J; Lowe, A J; Gurrin, L C; Dharmage, S C; Vuillermin, P; Tang, M L K; Ponsonby, A-L; Matheson, M; Hill, D J; Allen, K J.

In: Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Martin, PE, Eckert, JK, Koplin, JJ, Lowe, AJ, Gurrin, LC, Dharmage, SC, Vuillermin, P, Tang, MLK, Ponsonby, A-L, Matheson, M, Hill, DJ & Allen, KJ 2015, 'Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort.', Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 45, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.1111/cea.12406

APA

Martin, P. E., Eckert, J. K., Koplin, J. J., Lowe, A. J., Gurrin, L. C., Dharmage, S. C., Vuillermin, P., Tang, M. L. K., Ponsonby, A-L., Matheson, M., Hill, D. J., & Allen, K. J. (2015). Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort. Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 45(1). https://doi.org/10.1111/cea.12406

Vancouver

Martin PE, Eckert JK, Koplin JJ, Lowe AJ, Gurrin LC, Dharmage SC et al. Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort. Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2015 Jan;45(1). https://doi.org/10.1111/cea.12406

Author

Martin, P E ; Eckert, J K ; Koplin, J J ; Lowe, A J ; Gurrin, L C ; Dharmage, S C ; Vuillermin, P ; Tang, M L K ; Ponsonby, A-L ; Matheson, M ; Hill, D J ; Allen, K J. / Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort. In: Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2015 ; Vol. 45, No. 1.

Bibtex

@article{4c511e0c96214be298a4b6a632e758ff,
title = "Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The relationship between early onset eczema and food allergy among infants has never been examined in a population-based sample using the gold standard for diagnosis, oral food challenge. OBJECTIVE: We characterised the risk of challenge-proven food allergy among infants with eczema in the general population. METHODS: One-year-old infants (n = 4453 meeting criteria for this analysis) were assessed for history of eczema, received a nurse-administered eczema examination and underwent skin prick testing to peanut, egg and sesame. Those with a detectable wheal to one of the test foods underwent an oral food challenge irrespective of wheal size. The risk of food allergy, stratified by eczema severity and age of onset, was estimated using multivariate logistic regression with population sampling weights. RESULTS: One in five infants with eczema were allergic to peanut, egg white or sesame, compared to one in twenty-five infants without eczema (OR 6.2, 95% CI 4.9, 7.9, P <0.001). The prevalence of peanut allergy was low in the absence of eczema (0.7% 95% CI 0.4, 1.1). Infants with eczema were 11.0 times more likely to develop peanut allergy (95% CI 6.6, 18.6) and 5.8 times more likely to develop egg allergy (95% CI 4.6, 7.4) by 12 months than infants without eczema. 50.8% of infants (95% CI 42.8, 58.9) with early eczema onset (",
keywords = "eczema, egg allergy, food allergy, infants, peanut allergy, population-based cohort, risk factors",
author = "Martin, {P E} and Eckert, {J K} and Koplin, {J J} and Lowe, {A J} and Gurrin, {L C} and Dharmage, {S C} and P Vuillermin and Tang, {M L K} and A-L Ponsonby and M Matheson and Hill, {D J} and Allen, {K J}",
year = "2015",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1111/cea.12406",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Allergy",
issn = "0954-7894",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Which infants with eczema are at risk of food allergy? Results from a population-based cohort.

AU - Martin, P E

AU - Eckert, J K

AU - Koplin, J J

AU - Lowe, A J

AU - Gurrin, L C

AU - Dharmage, S C

AU - Vuillermin, P

AU - Tang, M L K

AU - Ponsonby, A-L

AU - Matheson, M

AU - Hill, D J

AU - Allen, K J

PY - 2015/1

Y1 - 2015/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: The relationship between early onset eczema and food allergy among infants has never been examined in a population-based sample using the gold standard for diagnosis, oral food challenge. OBJECTIVE: We characterised the risk of challenge-proven food allergy among infants with eczema in the general population. METHODS: One-year-old infants (n = 4453 meeting criteria for this analysis) were assessed for history of eczema, received a nurse-administered eczema examination and underwent skin prick testing to peanut, egg and sesame. Those with a detectable wheal to one of the test foods underwent an oral food challenge irrespective of wheal size. The risk of food allergy, stratified by eczema severity and age of onset, was estimated using multivariate logistic regression with population sampling weights. RESULTS: One in five infants with eczema were allergic to peanut, egg white or sesame, compared to one in twenty-five infants without eczema (OR 6.2, 95% CI 4.9, 7.9, P <0.001). The prevalence of peanut allergy was low in the absence of eczema (0.7% 95% CI 0.4, 1.1). Infants with eczema were 11.0 times more likely to develop peanut allergy (95% CI 6.6, 18.6) and 5.8 times more likely to develop egg allergy (95% CI 4.6, 7.4) by 12 months than infants without eczema. 50.8% of infants (95% CI 42.8, 58.9) with early eczema onset (

AB - BACKGROUND: The relationship between early onset eczema and food allergy among infants has never been examined in a population-based sample using the gold standard for diagnosis, oral food challenge. OBJECTIVE: We characterised the risk of challenge-proven food allergy among infants with eczema in the general population. METHODS: One-year-old infants (n = 4453 meeting criteria for this analysis) were assessed for history of eczema, received a nurse-administered eczema examination and underwent skin prick testing to peanut, egg and sesame. Those with a detectable wheal to one of the test foods underwent an oral food challenge irrespective of wheal size. The risk of food allergy, stratified by eczema severity and age of onset, was estimated using multivariate logistic regression with population sampling weights. RESULTS: One in five infants with eczema were allergic to peanut, egg white or sesame, compared to one in twenty-five infants without eczema (OR 6.2, 95% CI 4.9, 7.9, P <0.001). The prevalence of peanut allergy was low in the absence of eczema (0.7% 95% CI 0.4, 1.1). Infants with eczema were 11.0 times more likely to develop peanut allergy (95% CI 6.6, 18.6) and 5.8 times more likely to develop egg allergy (95% CI 4.6, 7.4) by 12 months than infants without eczema. 50.8% of infants (95% CI 42.8, 58.9) with early eczema onset (

KW - eczema

KW - egg allergy

KW - food allergy

KW - infants

KW - peanut allergy

KW - population-based cohort

KW - risk factors

U2 - 10.1111/cea.12406

DO - 10.1111/cea.12406

M3 - Article

C2 - 25210971

VL - 45

JO - Clinical and Experimental Allergy

JF - Clinical and Experimental Allergy

SN - 0954-7894

IS - 1

ER -