Which computer-use behaviours are most indicative of cognitive decline? Insights from an expert reference groupCitation formats

  • External authors:
  • Gemma Stringer
  • Ann Gledson
  • Davide Bruno
  • Kathryn Mcdonald
  • Jonathan Rust
  • Jennifer Thompson

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Which computer-use behaviours are most indicative of cognitive decline? Insights from an expert reference group. / Couth, Samuel; Stringer, Gemma; Leroi, Iracema; Sutcliffe, Alistair; Gledson, Ann; Bruno, Davide; Mcdonald, Kathryn; Montaldi, Daniela; Poliakoff, Ellen; Rust, Jonathan; Thompson, Jennifer; Brown, Laura J.E.

In: Health Informatics Journal, 2017.

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Author

Couth, Samuel ; Stringer, Gemma ; Leroi, Iracema ; Sutcliffe, Alistair ; Gledson, Ann ; Bruno, Davide ; Mcdonald, Kathryn ; Montaldi, Daniela ; Poliakoff, Ellen ; Rust, Jonathan ; Thompson, Jennifer ; Brown, Laura J.E. / Which computer-use behaviours are most indicative of cognitive decline? Insights from an expert reference group. In: Health Informatics Journal. 2017.

Bibtex

@article{042652ceca204b2f8b5487902567854e,
title = "Which computer-use behaviours are most indicative of cognitive decline? Insights from an expert reference group",
abstract = "Computer use is becoming ubiquitous among older adults. As computer use depends on complex cognitive functions, measuring individuals’ computer-use behaviours over time may provide a way to detect changes in their cognitive functioning. However, it is uncertain which computer-use behaviour changes are most likely to be associated with declines of particular cognitive functions. To address this, we convened six experts from clinical and cognitive neurosciences to take part in two workshops and a follow-up survey to gain consensus on which computer-use behaviours would likely be the strongest indicators of cognitive decline. This resulted in a list of 21 computer-use behaviours that the majority of experts agreed would offer a ‘strong indication’ of decline in a specific cognitive function, across Memory, Executive function, Language and Perception and Action domains. This list enables a hypothesis-driven approach to analysing computer-use behaviours predicted to be markers of cognitive decline.",
keywords = "Dementia, Cognitive decline, Computer-use activities, Expert opinion",
author = "Samuel Couth and Gemma Stringer and Iracema Leroi and Alistair Sutcliffe and Ann Gledson and Davide Bruno and Kathryn Mcdonald and Daniela Montaldi and Ellen Poliakoff and Jonathan Rust and Jennifer Thompson and Brown, {Laura J.E.}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1177/1460458217739342",
language = "English",
journal = "Health Informatics Journal",
issn = "1460-4582",
publisher = "Sage Publications Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Which computer-use behaviours are most indicative of cognitive decline? Insights from an expert reference group

AU - Couth, Samuel

AU - Stringer, Gemma

AU - Leroi, Iracema

AU - Sutcliffe, Alistair

AU - Gledson, Ann

AU - Bruno, Davide

AU - Mcdonald, Kathryn

AU - Montaldi, Daniela

AU - Poliakoff, Ellen

AU - Rust, Jonathan

AU - Thompson, Jennifer

AU - Brown, Laura J.E.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Computer use is becoming ubiquitous among older adults. As computer use depends on complex cognitive functions, measuring individuals’ computer-use behaviours over time may provide a way to detect changes in their cognitive functioning. However, it is uncertain which computer-use behaviour changes are most likely to be associated with declines of particular cognitive functions. To address this, we convened six experts from clinical and cognitive neurosciences to take part in two workshops and a follow-up survey to gain consensus on which computer-use behaviours would likely be the strongest indicators of cognitive decline. This resulted in a list of 21 computer-use behaviours that the majority of experts agreed would offer a ‘strong indication’ of decline in a specific cognitive function, across Memory, Executive function, Language and Perception and Action domains. This list enables a hypothesis-driven approach to analysing computer-use behaviours predicted to be markers of cognitive decline.

AB - Computer use is becoming ubiquitous among older adults. As computer use depends on complex cognitive functions, measuring individuals’ computer-use behaviours over time may provide a way to detect changes in their cognitive functioning. However, it is uncertain which computer-use behaviour changes are most likely to be associated with declines of particular cognitive functions. To address this, we convened six experts from clinical and cognitive neurosciences to take part in two workshops and a follow-up survey to gain consensus on which computer-use behaviours would likely be the strongest indicators of cognitive decline. This resulted in a list of 21 computer-use behaviours that the majority of experts agreed would offer a ‘strong indication’ of decline in a specific cognitive function, across Memory, Executive function, Language and Perception and Action domains. This list enables a hypothesis-driven approach to analysing computer-use behaviours predicted to be markers of cognitive decline.

KW - Dementia

KW - Cognitive decline

KW - Computer-use activities

KW - Expert opinion

U2 - 10.1177/1460458217739342

DO - 10.1177/1460458217739342

M3 - Article

JO - Health Informatics Journal

T2 - Health Informatics Journal

JF - Health Informatics Journal

SN - 1460-4582

ER -