When ancient meets modern: The relationship between postpartum non-susceptibility and contraception in sub-Saharan AfricaCitation formats

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When ancient meets modern: The relationship between postpartum non-susceptibility and contraception in sub-Saharan Africa. / Brown, Mark.

In: Journal of Biosocial Science, Vol. 39, No. 4, 07.2007, p. 493-515.

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@article{d619937fc0eb434694f34b1439067c3e,
title = "When ancient meets modern: The relationship between postpartum non-susceptibility and contraception in sub-Saharan Africa",
abstract = "Extended durations of postpartum non-susceptibility (PPNS) comprising lactational amenorrhoea and associated taboos on sex have been a central component of traditional reproductive regimes in sub-Saharan Africa. In situations of rising contraceptive prevalence this paper draws on data from the Demographic Health Surveys to consider the neglected interface between ancient and modern methods of regulation. The analysis reports striking contrasts between countries. At one extreme a woman's natural susceptibility status appears to have little bearing on the decision to use contraception in Zimbabwe, with widespread 'double-protection'. By contrast, contraceptive use in Kenya and Ghana builds directly onto underlying patterns of PPNS. Possible explanations for the differences and the implications for theory and policy are discussed. {\textcopyright} 2006 Cambridge University Press.",
author = "Mark Brown",
year = "2007",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1017/S002193200600157X",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "493--515",
journal = "Journal of Biosocial Science",
issn = "0021-9320",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - When ancient meets modern: The relationship between postpartum non-susceptibility and contraception in sub-Saharan Africa

AU - Brown, Mark

PY - 2007/7

Y1 - 2007/7

N2 - Extended durations of postpartum non-susceptibility (PPNS) comprising lactational amenorrhoea and associated taboos on sex have been a central component of traditional reproductive regimes in sub-Saharan Africa. In situations of rising contraceptive prevalence this paper draws on data from the Demographic Health Surveys to consider the neglected interface between ancient and modern methods of regulation. The analysis reports striking contrasts between countries. At one extreme a woman's natural susceptibility status appears to have little bearing on the decision to use contraception in Zimbabwe, with widespread 'double-protection'. By contrast, contraceptive use in Kenya and Ghana builds directly onto underlying patterns of PPNS. Possible explanations for the differences and the implications for theory and policy are discussed. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.

AB - Extended durations of postpartum non-susceptibility (PPNS) comprising lactational amenorrhoea and associated taboos on sex have been a central component of traditional reproductive regimes in sub-Saharan Africa. In situations of rising contraceptive prevalence this paper draws on data from the Demographic Health Surveys to consider the neglected interface between ancient and modern methods of regulation. The analysis reports striking contrasts between countries. At one extreme a woman's natural susceptibility status appears to have little bearing on the decision to use contraception in Zimbabwe, with widespread 'double-protection'. By contrast, contraceptive use in Kenya and Ghana builds directly onto underlying patterns of PPNS. Possible explanations for the differences and the implications for theory and policy are discussed. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.

U2 - 10.1017/S002193200600157X

DO - 10.1017/S002193200600157X

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 493

EP - 515

JO - Journal of Biosocial Science

JF - Journal of Biosocial Science

SN - 0021-9320

IS - 4

ER -