Transition club: Facilitating learning, participation and psychological adjustment during the transition to secondary schoolCitation formats

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Transition club: Facilitating learning, participation and psychological adjustment during the transition to secondary school. / Humphrey, Neil; Ainscow, Mel.

In: European Journal of Psychology of Education, Vol. 21, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 319-331.

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Humphrey, Neil; Ainscow, Mel / Transition club: Facilitating learning, participation and psychological adjustment during the transition to secondary school.

In: European Journal of Psychology of Education, Vol. 21, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 319-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex

@article{e7c280af32444c4a9098ad74597d3122,
title = "Transition club: Facilitating learning, participation and psychological adjustment during the transition to secondary school",
abstract = "The transition from the primary to secondary phase of education has been highlighted as an area of concern for policy makers, educators and researchers alike in recent years. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that it is during this crucial phase of compulsory education that many pupils are at risk of becoming marginalized and disaffected- thus, it is a salient topic for consideration in the broader discourse on inclusive education. The current paper reports on the attempts of a secondary school in the north-west of England to facilitate the learning, participation and psychological adjustment of new pupils through an innovative process called Transition Club. Using participant observations, questionnaires and a focus group interview we examined the views of 38 pupils who participated in its pilot. Qualitative content analysis of our dataset indicated that Transition Club was successful in providing pupils with a sense of belonging, helping them to navigate the 'maze' of secondary school, and making learning fun. There was also evidence to suggest that pupils who did not participate directly also experienced some of the benefits of the process. © 2006, I.S.P.A.",
keywords = "Inclusive education, Psychological adjustment, School transition",
author = "Neil Humphrey and Mel Ainscow",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1007/BF03173419",
volume = "21",
pages = "319--331",
journal = "European Journal of Psychology of Education",
issn = "0256-2928",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transition club: Facilitating learning, participation and psychological adjustment during the transition to secondary school

AU - Humphrey,Neil

AU - Ainscow,Mel

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - The transition from the primary to secondary phase of education has been highlighted as an area of concern for policy makers, educators and researchers alike in recent years. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that it is during this crucial phase of compulsory education that many pupils are at risk of becoming marginalized and disaffected- thus, it is a salient topic for consideration in the broader discourse on inclusive education. The current paper reports on the attempts of a secondary school in the north-west of England to facilitate the learning, participation and psychological adjustment of new pupils through an innovative process called Transition Club. Using participant observations, questionnaires and a focus group interview we examined the views of 38 pupils who participated in its pilot. Qualitative content analysis of our dataset indicated that Transition Club was successful in providing pupils with a sense of belonging, helping them to navigate the 'maze' of secondary school, and making learning fun. There was also evidence to suggest that pupils who did not participate directly also experienced some of the benefits of the process. © 2006, I.S.P.A.

AB - The transition from the primary to secondary phase of education has been highlighted as an area of concern for policy makers, educators and researchers alike in recent years. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that it is during this crucial phase of compulsory education that many pupils are at risk of becoming marginalized and disaffected- thus, it is a salient topic for consideration in the broader discourse on inclusive education. The current paper reports on the attempts of a secondary school in the north-west of England to facilitate the learning, participation and psychological adjustment of new pupils through an innovative process called Transition Club. Using participant observations, questionnaires and a focus group interview we examined the views of 38 pupils who participated in its pilot. Qualitative content analysis of our dataset indicated that Transition Club was successful in providing pupils with a sense of belonging, helping them to navigate the 'maze' of secondary school, and making learning fun. There was also evidence to suggest that pupils who did not participate directly also experienced some of the benefits of the process. © 2006, I.S.P.A.

KW - Inclusive education

KW - Psychological adjustment

KW - School transition

U2 - 10.1007/BF03173419

DO - 10.1007/BF03173419

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 319

EP - 331

JO - European Journal of Psychology of Education

T2 - European Journal of Psychology of Education

JF - European Journal of Psychology of Education

SN - 0256-2928

IS - 3

ER -