The University of Manchester longitudinal study of cognition in normal healthy old age, 1983 through 2003Citation formats

  • External authors:
  • P. M A Rabbitt
  • L. McInnes
  • P. Diggle
  • F. Holland
  • N. Bent
  • V. Abson
  • M. Horan

Standard

The University of Manchester longitudinal study of cognition in normal healthy old age, 1983 through 2003. / Rabbitt, P. M A; McInnes, L.; Diggle, P.; Holland, F.; Bent, N.; Abson, V.; Pendleton, N.; Horan, M.

In: Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, Vol. 11, No. 2-3, 06.2004, p. 245-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Rabbitt, PMA, McInnes, L, Diggle, P, Holland, F, Bent, N, Abson, V, Pendleton, N & Horan, M 2004, 'The University of Manchester longitudinal study of cognition in normal healthy old age, 1983 through 2003', Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, vol. 11, no. 2-3, pp. 245-279. https://doi.org/10.1080/13825580490511116

APA

Rabbitt, P. M. A., McInnes, L., Diggle, P., Holland, F., Bent, N., Abson, V., ... Horan, M. (2004). The University of Manchester longitudinal study of cognition in normal healthy old age, 1983 through 2003. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 11(2-3), 245-279. https://doi.org/10.1080/13825580490511116

Vancouver

Rabbitt PMA, McInnes L, Diggle P, Holland F, Bent N, Abson V et al. The University of Manchester longitudinal study of cognition in normal healthy old age, 1983 through 2003. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition. 2004 Jun;11(2-3):245-279. https://doi.org/10.1080/13825580490511116

Author

Rabbitt, P. M A ; McInnes, L. ; Diggle, P. ; Holland, F. ; Bent, N. ; Abson, V. ; Pendleton, N. ; Horan, M. / The University of Manchester longitudinal study of cognition in normal healthy old age, 1983 through 2003. In: Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 2-3. pp. 245-279.

Bibtex

@article{226305b1a7ae475bb49cd8b3caaf4b4a,
title = "The University of Manchester longitudinal study of cognition in normal healthy old age, 1983 through 2003",
abstract = "This paper describes the participants, design, method and tests used during a 20-year longitudinal study of cognitive changes in increasing age experienced by 6542 healthy residents of Greater Manchester and Newcastle-upon-Tyne, then aged from 42 to 92 years. Information collected and updated includes demographics and health, scores on two, biennially alternated batteries of cognitive tests, repeated administrations of the Beck and Yesavage depression inventories and of self-reports of stressful life events, self-evaluation and locus of control questionnaires and detailed information on lifestyle, hobbies and occupations, physical and social activities, family circumstances and health history. Records have allowed investigation of rates of cognitive changes from 36 months to 20 years preceding death from a variety of causes. Collection of blood and saliva provide, blood chemistry and cortisol levels to analyse associations of rates of cognitive change to genetic factors, blood chemistry and cortisol levels. A random effects analysis confirms marked effects of drop-out and practice due to repeated testing and shows how true rates of change, and of increases in variability between individuals may be ascertained after these have been identified.",
author = "Rabbitt, {P. M A} and L. McInnes and P. Diggle and F. Holland and N. Bent and V. Abson and N. Pendleton and M. Horan",
year = "2004",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1080/13825580490511116",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "245--279",
journal = "Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition",
number = "2-3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The University of Manchester longitudinal study of cognition in normal healthy old age, 1983 through 2003

AU - Rabbitt, P. M A

AU - McInnes, L.

AU - Diggle, P.

AU - Holland, F.

AU - Bent, N.

AU - Abson, V.

AU - Pendleton, N.

AU - Horan, M.

PY - 2004/6

Y1 - 2004/6

N2 - This paper describes the participants, design, method and tests used during a 20-year longitudinal study of cognitive changes in increasing age experienced by 6542 healthy residents of Greater Manchester and Newcastle-upon-Tyne, then aged from 42 to 92 years. Information collected and updated includes demographics and health, scores on two, biennially alternated batteries of cognitive tests, repeated administrations of the Beck and Yesavage depression inventories and of self-reports of stressful life events, self-evaluation and locus of control questionnaires and detailed information on lifestyle, hobbies and occupations, physical and social activities, family circumstances and health history. Records have allowed investigation of rates of cognitive changes from 36 months to 20 years preceding death from a variety of causes. Collection of blood and saliva provide, blood chemistry and cortisol levels to analyse associations of rates of cognitive change to genetic factors, blood chemistry and cortisol levels. A random effects analysis confirms marked effects of drop-out and practice due to repeated testing and shows how true rates of change, and of increases in variability between individuals may be ascertained after these have been identified.

AB - This paper describes the participants, design, method and tests used during a 20-year longitudinal study of cognitive changes in increasing age experienced by 6542 healthy residents of Greater Manchester and Newcastle-upon-Tyne, then aged from 42 to 92 years. Information collected and updated includes demographics and health, scores on two, biennially alternated batteries of cognitive tests, repeated administrations of the Beck and Yesavage depression inventories and of self-reports of stressful life events, self-evaluation and locus of control questionnaires and detailed information on lifestyle, hobbies and occupations, physical and social activities, family circumstances and health history. Records have allowed investigation of rates of cognitive changes from 36 months to 20 years preceding death from a variety of causes. Collection of blood and saliva provide, blood chemistry and cortisol levels to analyse associations of rates of cognitive change to genetic factors, blood chemistry and cortisol levels. A random effects analysis confirms marked effects of drop-out and practice due to repeated testing and shows how true rates of change, and of increases in variability between individuals may be ascertained after these have been identified.

U2 - 10.1080/13825580490511116

DO - 10.1080/13825580490511116

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 245

EP - 279

JO - Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition

T2 - Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition

JF - Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition

IS - 2-3

ER -