The Status Stratification of Radical Right Support: Reconsidering the Occupational Profile of UKIP's ElectorateCitation formats

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The Status Stratification of Radical Right Support: Reconsidering the Occupational Profile of UKIP's Electorate. / Carella, Leonardo; Ford, Robert.

In: Electoral Studies, Vol. 67, 102214, 01.10.2020.

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@article{a6fcd5a8160c465b80acfbfdfdbe700e,
title = "The Status Stratification of Radical Right Support: Reconsidering the Occupational Profile of UKIP's Electorate",
abstract = "Drawing on Weber's conceptualisation of class and status as distinct principles of social order, this article argues that support for the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) is better understood as a status-based phenomenon than a class-based one. Operationalising status as a function of social distance between occupational groups, we show that whilst class was a poor predictor of UKIP support in 2015, status scores were strongly and negatively correlated to the likelihood of supporting UKIP. The opposite is true for the Conservativesand the Labour Party's electorates, which were still much more strongly aligned on class lines. The effect of status on UKIP preference remains strong after controlling for educational qualifications, suggesting that the status scale taps into a deeper divide than simply an educational cleavage. Moreover, we find that status plays a similar role in predicting the likelihood of voting for right-wing populist parties (RPPs) in other Western European countries as well.",
author = "Leonardo Carella and Robert Ford",
note = "Funding Information: This research was partly supported by an ESRC (Grand Union DTP) research training support grant and studentship. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2020 Elsevier Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.electstud.2020.102214",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
journal = "Electoral Studies",
issn = "0261-3794",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Status Stratification of Radical Right Support: Reconsidering the Occupational Profile of UKIP's Electorate

AU - Carella, Leonardo

AU - Ford, Robert

N1 - Funding Information: This research was partly supported by an ESRC (Grand Union DTP) research training support grant and studentship. Publisher Copyright: © 2020 Elsevier Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/10/1

Y1 - 2020/10/1

N2 - Drawing on Weber's conceptualisation of class and status as distinct principles of social order, this article argues that support for the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) is better understood as a status-based phenomenon than a class-based one. Operationalising status as a function of social distance between occupational groups, we show that whilst class was a poor predictor of UKIP support in 2015, status scores were strongly and negatively correlated to the likelihood of supporting UKIP. The opposite is true for the Conservativesand the Labour Party's electorates, which were still much more strongly aligned on class lines. The effect of status on UKIP preference remains strong after controlling for educational qualifications, suggesting that the status scale taps into a deeper divide than simply an educational cleavage. Moreover, we find that status plays a similar role in predicting the likelihood of voting for right-wing populist parties (RPPs) in other Western European countries as well.

AB - Drawing on Weber's conceptualisation of class and status as distinct principles of social order, this article argues that support for the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) is better understood as a status-based phenomenon than a class-based one. Operationalising status as a function of social distance between occupational groups, we show that whilst class was a poor predictor of UKIP support in 2015, status scores were strongly and negatively correlated to the likelihood of supporting UKIP. The opposite is true for the Conservativesand the Labour Party's electorates, which were still much more strongly aligned on class lines. The effect of status on UKIP preference remains strong after controlling for educational qualifications, suggesting that the status scale taps into a deeper divide than simply an educational cleavage. Moreover, we find that status plays a similar role in predicting the likelihood of voting for right-wing populist parties (RPPs) in other Western European countries as well.

U2 - 10.1016/j.electstud.2020.102214

DO - 10.1016/j.electstud.2020.102214

M3 - Article

VL - 67

JO - Electoral Studies

JF - Electoral Studies

SN - 0261-3794

M1 - 102214

ER -