The Interactional Organization of Self-praise: Epistemics, Preference Organization, and Implications for Identity ResearchCitation formats

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The Interactional Organization of Self-praise: Epistemics, Preference Organization, and Implications for Identity Research. / Speer, Susan A.

In: Social Psychology Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 1, 03.2012, p. 52-79.

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@article{71cb4f765103496ab3d5c4ccc167e0cd,
title = "The Interactional Organization of Self-praise: Epistemics, Preference Organization, and Implications for Identity Research",
abstract = "This article contributes to a social psychological understanding of identity by identifying some features of the interactional organization of self-praise. Early conversation analytic work on the epistemics of self-assessment and constraints against self-praise has shown that praising oneself is an interactionally delicate matter that may leave one vulnerable to {"}unfavorable character assessment{"} or accusations of bragging (Pomerantz 1978:89). Drawing on data examples from a range of settings, this article develops Pomerantz's work and examines the role of reported third-party compliments (e.g., {"}she . . . said 'you look really lovely'{"}) in objectifying self-praise. Analyzing instances in which speakers initiate repair on their self-descriptions in favor of reported third-party compliments, I provide evidence of practices suggesting a norm against direct self-praise and an interactional preference for embedding positive self-descriptions within a third-party attribution. I consider the implications of these analyses for a social psychological understanding of identity and its measurement. {\textcopyright} American Sociological Association 2012.",
keywords = "compliments, conversation analysis, identity, preference organization, self-assessment, self-praise, self-repair",
author = "Speer, {Susan A.}",
year = "2012",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1177/0190272511432939",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "52--79",
journal = "Social Psychology Quarterly",
issn = "0190-2725",
publisher = "Sage Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Interactional Organization of Self-praise: Epistemics, Preference Organization, and Implications for Identity Research

AU - Speer, Susan A.

PY - 2012/3

Y1 - 2012/3

N2 - This article contributes to a social psychological understanding of identity by identifying some features of the interactional organization of self-praise. Early conversation analytic work on the epistemics of self-assessment and constraints against self-praise has shown that praising oneself is an interactionally delicate matter that may leave one vulnerable to "unfavorable character assessment" or accusations of bragging (Pomerantz 1978:89). Drawing on data examples from a range of settings, this article develops Pomerantz's work and examines the role of reported third-party compliments (e.g., "she . . . said 'you look really lovely'") in objectifying self-praise. Analyzing instances in which speakers initiate repair on their self-descriptions in favor of reported third-party compliments, I provide evidence of practices suggesting a norm against direct self-praise and an interactional preference for embedding positive self-descriptions within a third-party attribution. I consider the implications of these analyses for a social psychological understanding of identity and its measurement. © American Sociological Association 2012.

AB - This article contributes to a social psychological understanding of identity by identifying some features of the interactional organization of self-praise. Early conversation analytic work on the epistemics of self-assessment and constraints against self-praise has shown that praising oneself is an interactionally delicate matter that may leave one vulnerable to "unfavorable character assessment" or accusations of bragging (Pomerantz 1978:89). Drawing on data examples from a range of settings, this article develops Pomerantz's work and examines the role of reported third-party compliments (e.g., "she . . . said 'you look really lovely'") in objectifying self-praise. Analyzing instances in which speakers initiate repair on their self-descriptions in favor of reported third-party compliments, I provide evidence of practices suggesting a norm against direct self-praise and an interactional preference for embedding positive self-descriptions within a third-party attribution. I consider the implications of these analyses for a social psychological understanding of identity and its measurement. © American Sociological Association 2012.

KW - compliments

KW - conversation analysis

KW - identity

KW - preference organization

KW - self-assessment

KW - self-praise

KW - self-repair

U2 - 10.1177/0190272511432939

DO - 10.1177/0190272511432939

M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - 52

EP - 79

JO - Social Psychology Quarterly

JF - Social Psychology Quarterly

SN - 0190-2725

IS - 1

ER -