The incidence of medically reported work-related ill health in the UK construction industryCitation formats

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The incidence of medically reported work-related ill health in the UK construction industry. / Stocks, S. J.; McNamee, R.; Carder, M.; Agius, R. M.

In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 67, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 574-576.

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Stocks, SJ, McNamee, R, Carder, M & Agius, RM 2010, 'The incidence of medically reported work-related ill health in the UK construction industry' Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 67, no. 8, pp. 574-576. https://doi.org/10.1136/oem.2009.053595

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Stocks, S. J. ; McNamee, R. ; Carder, M. ; Agius, R. M. / The incidence of medically reported work-related ill health in the UK construction industry. In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 67, No. 8. pp. 574-576.

Bibtex

@article{87e044cf91cd432e8fc1fc3bff45dc70,
title = "The incidence of medically reported work-related ill health in the UK construction industry",
abstract = "Objective: Self-reported work-related ill health (SWI) data show a high incidence of occupational ill health and a high burden of cancer attributable to occupational factors in the UK construction industry. However, there is little information on the incidence of medically reported work-related ill health (WRI) within this industry. This study aims to examine the incidence of WRI within the UK construction industry. Method: Standardised incidence rate ratios (SRRs) were used to compare incidence rates of reports of medically certified work-related ill health returned to The Health and Occupation Reporting network (THOR) within the UK construction industry with all other UK industries combined. Results: Male UK construction industry workers aged under 65 years had significantly raised SRRs for respiratory (3.8, 95{\%} CI 3.5 to 4.2), skin (1.6, 1.4 to 1.8) and musculoskeletal disorders (MSD; 1.9, 1.6 to 2.2). These SRRs were further raised for those working within a construction trade. The increased SRRs for skin disease within male construction industry workers were due to contact dermatitis (1.4, 1.2 to 1.6) and neoplasia (4.2, 3.3 to 5.3). For respiratory disease, the increased SRRs were due to non-malignant pleural disease (7.1, 6.3 to 8.1), mesothelioma (7.1, 6.0 to 8.3), lung cancer (5.4, 3.2 to 8.9) and pneumoconiosis (5.5, 3.7 to 8.0), but the SRRs for asthma (0.09, 0.06 to 0.11) and mental ill health (0.3, 0.1 to 0.4) were significantly reduced. Conclusion: The significantly raised SRRs for medically reported MSD and significantly reduced SRRs for mental ill health in construction workers confirm self-reported UK data. These SRRs provide a baseline of the incidence of WRI in the UK construction industry from which to monitor the effects of changes in policy or exposures.",
author = "Stocks, {S. J.} and R. McNamee and M. Carder and Agius, {R. M.}",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1136/oem.2009.053595",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
pages = "574--576",
journal = "Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1351-0711",
publisher = "B M J Group",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The incidence of medically reported work-related ill health in the UK construction industry

AU - Stocks, S. J.

AU - McNamee, R.

AU - Carder, M.

AU - Agius, R. M.

PY - 2010/8

Y1 - 2010/8

N2 - Objective: Self-reported work-related ill health (SWI) data show a high incidence of occupational ill health and a high burden of cancer attributable to occupational factors in the UK construction industry. However, there is little information on the incidence of medically reported work-related ill health (WRI) within this industry. This study aims to examine the incidence of WRI within the UK construction industry. Method: Standardised incidence rate ratios (SRRs) were used to compare incidence rates of reports of medically certified work-related ill health returned to The Health and Occupation Reporting network (THOR) within the UK construction industry with all other UK industries combined. Results: Male UK construction industry workers aged under 65 years had significantly raised SRRs for respiratory (3.8, 95% CI 3.5 to 4.2), skin (1.6, 1.4 to 1.8) and musculoskeletal disorders (MSD; 1.9, 1.6 to 2.2). These SRRs were further raised for those working within a construction trade. The increased SRRs for skin disease within male construction industry workers were due to contact dermatitis (1.4, 1.2 to 1.6) and neoplasia (4.2, 3.3 to 5.3). For respiratory disease, the increased SRRs were due to non-malignant pleural disease (7.1, 6.3 to 8.1), mesothelioma (7.1, 6.0 to 8.3), lung cancer (5.4, 3.2 to 8.9) and pneumoconiosis (5.5, 3.7 to 8.0), but the SRRs for asthma (0.09, 0.06 to 0.11) and mental ill health (0.3, 0.1 to 0.4) were significantly reduced. Conclusion: The significantly raised SRRs for medically reported MSD and significantly reduced SRRs for mental ill health in construction workers confirm self-reported UK data. These SRRs provide a baseline of the incidence of WRI in the UK construction industry from which to monitor the effects of changes in policy or exposures.

AB - Objective: Self-reported work-related ill health (SWI) data show a high incidence of occupational ill health and a high burden of cancer attributable to occupational factors in the UK construction industry. However, there is little information on the incidence of medically reported work-related ill health (WRI) within this industry. This study aims to examine the incidence of WRI within the UK construction industry. Method: Standardised incidence rate ratios (SRRs) were used to compare incidence rates of reports of medically certified work-related ill health returned to The Health and Occupation Reporting network (THOR) within the UK construction industry with all other UK industries combined. Results: Male UK construction industry workers aged under 65 years had significantly raised SRRs for respiratory (3.8, 95% CI 3.5 to 4.2), skin (1.6, 1.4 to 1.8) and musculoskeletal disorders (MSD; 1.9, 1.6 to 2.2). These SRRs were further raised for those working within a construction trade. The increased SRRs for skin disease within male construction industry workers were due to contact dermatitis (1.4, 1.2 to 1.6) and neoplasia (4.2, 3.3 to 5.3). For respiratory disease, the increased SRRs were due to non-malignant pleural disease (7.1, 6.3 to 8.1), mesothelioma (7.1, 6.0 to 8.3), lung cancer (5.4, 3.2 to 8.9) and pneumoconiosis (5.5, 3.7 to 8.0), but the SRRs for asthma (0.09, 0.06 to 0.11) and mental ill health (0.3, 0.1 to 0.4) were significantly reduced. Conclusion: The significantly raised SRRs for medically reported MSD and significantly reduced SRRs for mental ill health in construction workers confirm self-reported UK data. These SRRs provide a baseline of the incidence of WRI in the UK construction industry from which to monitor the effects of changes in policy or exposures.

U2 - 10.1136/oem.2009.053595

DO - 10.1136/oem.2009.053595

M3 - Article

VL - 67

SP - 574

EP - 576

JO - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1351-0711

IS - 8

ER -