The impact of science intervention on caregiver attitudes and behaviours towards science for deaf and hearing childrenCitation formats

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The impact of science intervention on caregiver attitudes and behaviours towards science for deaf and hearing children. / Jones, Lindsey; Chilton, Helen; Theakston, Anna.

In: Deafness and Education International, 09.11.2020.

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@article{f93f95b2c8f640a3b22aeac2a145d001,
title = "The impact of science intervention on caregiver attitudes and behaviours towards science for deaf and hearing children",
abstract = "Assessment of deaf children has found that their early understanding in science is behind that of their hearing peers. Research shows that parental attitudes and behaviours can affect educational outcomes but few studies have considered the effects of attitudes towards science on parent/child interactions in the home and thus, the effects on attainment. We studied whether caregiver participation in a pilot intervention would influence attitudes and reported behaviours towards science learning in the home. Method: Caregivers of deaf and hearing pre-school children (N= 18) completed a questionnaire at the start and end of a year-long intervention to determine whether there was a relationship between the level of engagement with the intervention and attitudes towards science both pre- and post-study. Findings: There was a significant positive shift in the amount of reported science talk between caregivers and their children. No relationship between engagement and attitudes was found. Conclusions: We propose that irrespective of group (control or intervention), participating in an intervention involving science talk led to a reported increase in science talk and a generally positive view of science across all groups. ",
author = "Lindsey Jones and Helen Chilton and Anna Theakston",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "9",
doi = "10.1080/14643154.2020.1842623",
language = "English",
journal = "Deafness and Education International",
issn = "1464-3154",
publisher = "Maney Publishing",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of science intervention on caregiver attitudes and behaviours towards science for deaf and hearing children

AU - Jones, Lindsey

AU - Chilton, Helen

AU - Theakston, Anna

PY - 2020/11/9

Y1 - 2020/11/9

N2 - Assessment of deaf children has found that their early understanding in science is behind that of their hearing peers. Research shows that parental attitudes and behaviours can affect educational outcomes but few studies have considered the effects of attitudes towards science on parent/child interactions in the home and thus, the effects on attainment. We studied whether caregiver participation in a pilot intervention would influence attitudes and reported behaviours towards science learning in the home. Method: Caregivers of deaf and hearing pre-school children (N= 18) completed a questionnaire at the start and end of a year-long intervention to determine whether there was a relationship between the level of engagement with the intervention and attitudes towards science both pre- and post-study. Findings: There was a significant positive shift in the amount of reported science talk between caregivers and their children. No relationship between engagement and attitudes was found. Conclusions: We propose that irrespective of group (control or intervention), participating in an intervention involving science talk led to a reported increase in science talk and a generally positive view of science across all groups.

AB - Assessment of deaf children has found that their early understanding in science is behind that of their hearing peers. Research shows that parental attitudes and behaviours can affect educational outcomes but few studies have considered the effects of attitudes towards science on parent/child interactions in the home and thus, the effects on attainment. We studied whether caregiver participation in a pilot intervention would influence attitudes and reported behaviours towards science learning in the home. Method: Caregivers of deaf and hearing pre-school children (N= 18) completed a questionnaire at the start and end of a year-long intervention to determine whether there was a relationship between the level of engagement with the intervention and attitudes towards science both pre- and post-study. Findings: There was a significant positive shift in the amount of reported science talk between caregivers and their children. No relationship between engagement and attitudes was found. Conclusions: We propose that irrespective of group (control or intervention), participating in an intervention involving science talk led to a reported increase in science talk and a generally positive view of science across all groups.

U2 - 10.1080/14643154.2020.1842623

DO - 10.1080/14643154.2020.1842623

M3 - Article

JO - Deafness and Education International

JF - Deafness and Education International

SN - 1464-3154

ER -