The impact of COVID-19 on digital data practices in museums and art galleries in the UK and the USCitation formats

Standard

The impact of COVID-19 on digital data practices in museums and art galleries in the UK and the US. / Noehrer, Lukas; Gilmore, Abigail; Jay, Caroline; Yehudi, Yo.

In: Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, Vol. 8, No. 1, 236, 01.12.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{a07a1e39059d498c9618256ccda4c509,
title = "The impact of COVID-19 on digital data practices in museums and art galleries in the UK and the US",
abstract = "The first quarter of 2020 heralded the beginning of an uncertain future for museums and galleries as the COVID-19 pandemic hit and the only means to stay {\textquoteleft}open{\textquoteright} was to turn towards the digital. In this paper, we investigate how the physical closure of museum buildings due to lockdown restrictions caused shockwaves within their digital strategies and changed their data practices potentially for good. We review the impact of COVID-19 on the museum sector, based on literature and desk research, with a focus on the implications for three museums and art galleries in the United Kingdom and the United States, and their mission, objectives, and digital data practices. We then present an analysis of ten qualitative interviews with expert witnesses working in the sector, representing different roles and types of institutions, undertaken between April and October 2020. Our research finds that digital engagement with museum content and practices around data in institutions have changed and that digital methods for organising and accessing collections for both staff and the general public have become more important. We present evidence that strategic preparedness influenced how well institutions were able to transition during closure and that metrics data became pivotal in understanding this novel situation. Increased engagement online changed traditional audience profiles, challenging museums to find ways of accommodating new forms of engagement in order to survive and thrive in the post-pandemic environment.",
author = "Lukas Noehrer and Abigail Gilmore and Caroline Jay and Yo Yehudi",
note = "Funding Information: The National Gallery. Directly grant-in-aid funded by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), the National Gallery in London has charitable status and is constituted as a Non-Departmental Public Body. The Gallery dates to the same year as the foundation of MAG, although its origins were ostensibly supply rather than demand-led, when in 1823 first the collector John Julius Angerstein and then landscape painter and collector Sir George Beaumont gifted their collections of paintings to the nation, necessitating a new national institution with suitable buildings for conservation and display of these collections. Funding Information: This work was supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) grant EP/R513131/1 for the University of Manchester and we further acknowledge funding for Gilmore from AHRC/UKRI COVID-19: Impacts on the Cultural Industries and Implications for Policy (AH/V00994X/1) and AHRC Centre of Excellence for Policy and Evidence in the Creative Industries (AH/S001298/ 1). We would also like to thank our participants for their time in participating in this study. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021, The Author(s).",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1057/s41599-021-00921-8",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Humanities and Social Sciences Communications",
issn = "2662-9992",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of COVID-19 on digital data practices in museums and art galleries in the UK and the US

AU - Noehrer, Lukas

AU - Gilmore, Abigail

AU - Jay, Caroline

AU - Yehudi, Yo

N1 - Funding Information: The National Gallery. Directly grant-in-aid funded by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), the National Gallery in London has charitable status and is constituted as a Non-Departmental Public Body. The Gallery dates to the same year as the foundation of MAG, although its origins were ostensibly supply rather than demand-led, when in 1823 first the collector John Julius Angerstein and then landscape painter and collector Sir George Beaumont gifted their collections of paintings to the nation, necessitating a new national institution with suitable buildings for conservation and display of these collections. Funding Information: This work was supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) grant EP/R513131/1 for the University of Manchester and we further acknowledge funding for Gilmore from AHRC/UKRI COVID-19: Impacts on the Cultural Industries and Implications for Policy (AH/V00994X/1) and AHRC Centre of Excellence for Policy and Evidence in the Creative Industries (AH/S001298/ 1). We would also like to thank our participants for their time in participating in this study. Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s).

PY - 2021/12/1

Y1 - 2021/12/1

N2 - The first quarter of 2020 heralded the beginning of an uncertain future for museums and galleries as the COVID-19 pandemic hit and the only means to stay ‘open’ was to turn towards the digital. In this paper, we investigate how the physical closure of museum buildings due to lockdown restrictions caused shockwaves within their digital strategies and changed their data practices potentially for good. We review the impact of COVID-19 on the museum sector, based on literature and desk research, with a focus on the implications for three museums and art galleries in the United Kingdom and the United States, and their mission, objectives, and digital data practices. We then present an analysis of ten qualitative interviews with expert witnesses working in the sector, representing different roles and types of institutions, undertaken between April and October 2020. Our research finds that digital engagement with museum content and practices around data in institutions have changed and that digital methods for organising and accessing collections for both staff and the general public have become more important. We present evidence that strategic preparedness influenced how well institutions were able to transition during closure and that metrics data became pivotal in understanding this novel situation. Increased engagement online changed traditional audience profiles, challenging museums to find ways of accommodating new forms of engagement in order to survive and thrive in the post-pandemic environment.

AB - The first quarter of 2020 heralded the beginning of an uncertain future for museums and galleries as the COVID-19 pandemic hit and the only means to stay ‘open’ was to turn towards the digital. In this paper, we investigate how the physical closure of museum buildings due to lockdown restrictions caused shockwaves within their digital strategies and changed their data practices potentially for good. We review the impact of COVID-19 on the museum sector, based on literature and desk research, with a focus on the implications for three museums and art galleries in the United Kingdom and the United States, and their mission, objectives, and digital data practices. We then present an analysis of ten qualitative interviews with expert witnesses working in the sector, representing different roles and types of institutions, undertaken between April and October 2020. Our research finds that digital engagement with museum content and practices around data in institutions have changed and that digital methods for organising and accessing collections for both staff and the general public have become more important. We present evidence that strategic preparedness influenced how well institutions were able to transition during closure and that metrics data became pivotal in understanding this novel situation. Increased engagement online changed traditional audience profiles, challenging museums to find ways of accommodating new forms of engagement in order to survive and thrive in the post-pandemic environment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85117421820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/4c56886c-baf4-3543-96dd-07e69d3541cf/

U2 - 10.1057/s41599-021-00921-8

DO - 10.1057/s41599-021-00921-8

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Humanities and Social Sciences Communications

JF - Humanities and Social Sciences Communications

SN - 2662-9992

IS - 1

M1 - 236

ER -