The Art of ResilienceCitation formats

Standard

The Art of Resilience : Veteran Therapy from the Occupational to the Creative 1914-1945. / Carden-Coyne, Ana.

The First World War and Health: Rethinking Resilience. ed. / Leo van Bergen; Eric Vermetten. Leiden : Brill , 2020. p. 39-70 (History of Warfare130; Vol. 130).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Harvard

Carden-Coyne, A 2020, The Art of Resilience: Veteran Therapy from the Occupational to the Creative 1914-1945. in L van Bergen & E Vermetten (eds), The First World War and Health: Rethinking Resilience. History of Warfare130, vol. 130, Brill , Leiden, pp. 39-70.

APA

Carden-Coyne, A. (2020). The Art of Resilience: Veteran Therapy from the Occupational to the Creative 1914-1945. In L. van Bergen, & E. Vermetten (Eds.), The First World War and Health: Rethinking Resilience (pp. 39-70). (History of Warfare130; Vol. 130). Brill .

Vancouver

Carden-Coyne A. The Art of Resilience: Veteran Therapy from the Occupational to the Creative 1914-1945. In van Bergen L, Vermetten E, editors, The First World War and Health: Rethinking Resilience. Leiden: Brill . 2020. p. 39-70. (History of Warfare130).

Author

Carden-Coyne, Ana. / The Art of Resilience : Veteran Therapy from the Occupational to the Creative 1914-1945. The First World War and Health: Rethinking Resilience. editor / Leo van Bergen ; Eric Vermetten. Leiden : Brill , 2020. pp. 39-70 (History of Warfare130).

Bibtex

@inbook{3e35a085e51143cda3e2f87e7cbe9fa9,
title = "The Art of Resilience: Veteran Therapy from the Occupational to the Creative 1914-1945",
abstract = "This chapter explores how the teaching and learning of arts and crafts not only stimulated men{\textquoteright}s personal creativity at a time of suffering, but enabled safe reckoning with, and release from, traumatic memories, calm self- restoration, and even a degree of soft resistance to the military system, all of which supported a degree of veteran resilience. However, it is also evident that sustained resilience could not come from art therapy alone, but rather as a part of personal, emotional, and financial support, as well as an element of wider cultural appreciation of the ex-servicemen{\textquoteright}s creativity and artisanship. To that extent cultural education about the potential impact of creativity requires wider understanding in society as a whole to destigmatise the image of the damaged veteran, in turn strengthening veterans{\textquoteright} resolve to actualize change in their own lives. Over-emphasizing the veteran{\textquoteright}s agency, however, does not fully recognize structural (social, political, financial) issues regarding trauma and disability, which could also have a negative effect on the resilience of pa- tients in achieving longer-term recovery. Art therapy could be adapted to tailor to individual needs. The danger of seeing resilience as a point in time when {\textquoteleft}inner strength{\textquoteright} is accessed and mobilised is part of a historic conundrum; in the two world wars it was erroneously understood as {\textquoteleft}will power{\textquoteright}.",
keywords = "WW1, health, resilience",
author = "Ana Carden-Coyne",
year = "2020",
month = apr,
day = "14",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-90-04-42417-3",
series = "History of Warfare130",
publisher = "Brill ",
pages = "39--70",
editor = "{van Bergen}, Leo and Eric Vermetten",
booktitle = "The First World War and Health",
address = "Netherlands",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - The Art of Resilience

T2 - Veteran Therapy from the Occupational to the Creative 1914-1945

AU - Carden-Coyne, Ana

PY - 2020/4/14

Y1 - 2020/4/14

N2 - This chapter explores how the teaching and learning of arts and crafts not only stimulated men’s personal creativity at a time of suffering, but enabled safe reckoning with, and release from, traumatic memories, calm self- restoration, and even a degree of soft resistance to the military system, all of which supported a degree of veteran resilience. However, it is also evident that sustained resilience could not come from art therapy alone, but rather as a part of personal, emotional, and financial support, as well as an element of wider cultural appreciation of the ex-servicemen’s creativity and artisanship. To that extent cultural education about the potential impact of creativity requires wider understanding in society as a whole to destigmatise the image of the damaged veteran, in turn strengthening veterans’ resolve to actualize change in their own lives. Over-emphasizing the veteran’s agency, however, does not fully recognize structural (social, political, financial) issues regarding trauma and disability, which could also have a negative effect on the resilience of pa- tients in achieving longer-term recovery. Art therapy could be adapted to tailor to individual needs. The danger of seeing resilience as a point in time when ‘inner strength’ is accessed and mobilised is part of a historic conundrum; in the two world wars it was erroneously understood as ‘will power’.

AB - This chapter explores how the teaching and learning of arts and crafts not only stimulated men’s personal creativity at a time of suffering, but enabled safe reckoning with, and release from, traumatic memories, calm self- restoration, and even a degree of soft resistance to the military system, all of which supported a degree of veteran resilience. However, it is also evident that sustained resilience could not come from art therapy alone, but rather as a part of personal, emotional, and financial support, as well as an element of wider cultural appreciation of the ex-servicemen’s creativity and artisanship. To that extent cultural education about the potential impact of creativity requires wider understanding in society as a whole to destigmatise the image of the damaged veteran, in turn strengthening veterans’ resolve to actualize change in their own lives. Over-emphasizing the veteran’s agency, however, does not fully recognize structural (social, political, financial) issues regarding trauma and disability, which could also have a negative effect on the resilience of pa- tients in achieving longer-term recovery. Art therapy could be adapted to tailor to individual needs. The danger of seeing resilience as a point in time when ‘inner strength’ is accessed and mobilised is part of a historic conundrum; in the two world wars it was erroneously understood as ‘will power’.

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KW - health

KW - resilience

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SN - 978-90-04-42417-3

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BT - The First World War and Health

A2 - van Bergen, Leo

A2 - Vermetten, Eric

PB - Brill

CY - Leiden

ER -