The application of criminological theory to a Japanese context: Power-control theoryCitation formats

  • Authors:
  • HIroshi Tsutomi
  • Laura Bui
  • MItsuaki Ueda
  • David Farrington

Standard

The application of criminological theory to a Japanese context: Power-control theory : Power-control theory. / Tsutomi, HIroshi; Bui, Laura; Ueda, MItsuaki; Farrington, David.

In: International Journal of Criminological and Sociological Theory, Vol. 6, No. 4, 2013, p. 114-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Tsutomi, HI, Bui, L, Ueda, MI & Farrington, D 2013, 'The application of criminological theory to a Japanese context: Power-control theory: Power-control theory', International Journal of Criminological and Sociological Theory, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 114-128.

APA

Tsutomi, HI., Bui, L., Ueda, MI., & Farrington, D. (2013). The application of criminological theory to a Japanese context: Power-control theory: Power-control theory. International Journal of Criminological and Sociological Theory, 6(4), 114-128.

Vancouver

Tsutomi HI, Bui L, Ueda MI, Farrington D. The application of criminological theory to a Japanese context: Power-control theory: Power-control theory. International Journal of Criminological and Sociological Theory. 2013;6(4):114-128.

Author

Tsutomi, HIroshi ; Bui, Laura ; Ueda, MItsuaki ; Farrington, David. / The application of criminological theory to a Japanese context: Power-control theory : Power-control theory. In: International Journal of Criminological and Sociological Theory. 2013 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 114-128.

Bibtex

@article{f4e24ea3ae96472180c5a021b9897126,
title = "The application of criminological theory to a Japanese context: Power-control theory: Power-control theory",
abstract = "The present study investigates the applicability of power-control theory in explaining the gender discrepancy in deviance and delinquency in Japan, a patriarchal society. Conceived by Hagan and his colleagues, power-control theory attempts to explain gender differences in criminality and suggests that occupational patriarchy is responsible for this gender discrepancy in crime. Within a Japanese context, the findings reveal that the gender difference in common delinquency is only significant within more patriarchal households and is non-significant in less patriarchal households. These results are more distinct than the previous results from a Canadian sample, meaning that power-control theory may be more applicable to more patriarchal societies like Japan than to more egalitarian societies like Canada.",
author = "HIroshi Tsutomi and Laura Bui and MItsuaki Ueda and David Farrington",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "114--128",
journal = "International Journal of Criminological and Sociological Theory",
issn = "1916-2782",
publisher = "York University",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The application of criminological theory to a Japanese context: Power-control theory

T2 - Power-control theory

AU - Tsutomi, HIroshi

AU - Bui, Laura

AU - Ueda, MItsuaki

AU - Farrington, David

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - The present study investigates the applicability of power-control theory in explaining the gender discrepancy in deviance and delinquency in Japan, a patriarchal society. Conceived by Hagan and his colleagues, power-control theory attempts to explain gender differences in criminality and suggests that occupational patriarchy is responsible for this gender discrepancy in crime. Within a Japanese context, the findings reveal that the gender difference in common delinquency is only significant within more patriarchal households and is non-significant in less patriarchal households. These results are more distinct than the previous results from a Canadian sample, meaning that power-control theory may be more applicable to more patriarchal societies like Japan than to more egalitarian societies like Canada.

AB - The present study investigates the applicability of power-control theory in explaining the gender discrepancy in deviance and delinquency in Japan, a patriarchal society. Conceived by Hagan and his colleagues, power-control theory attempts to explain gender differences in criminality and suggests that occupational patriarchy is responsible for this gender discrepancy in crime. Within a Japanese context, the findings reveal that the gender difference in common delinquency is only significant within more patriarchal households and is non-significant in less patriarchal households. These results are more distinct than the previous results from a Canadian sample, meaning that power-control theory may be more applicable to more patriarchal societies like Japan than to more egalitarian societies like Canada.

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 114

EP - 128

JO - International Journal of Criminological and Sociological Theory

JF - International Journal of Criminological and Sociological Theory

SN - 1916-2782

IS - 4

ER -