The advanced radiotherapy network (ART-NET) UK lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy surveyCitation formats

  • External authors:
  • Matthew Beasley
  • Sean Brown
  • Helen McNair
  • Kevin Franks
  • Louise Murray
  • Ann Henry

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The advanced radiotherapy network (ART-NET) UK lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy survey : national provision and a focus on image guidance. / Beasley, Matthew; Brown, Sean; McNair, Helen; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Franks, Kevin; Murray, Louise; van Herk, Marcel; Henry, Ann.

In: The British journal of radiology, 2019, p. 20180988.

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Beasley, Matthew ; Brown, Sean ; McNair, Helen ; Faivre-Finn, Corinne ; Franks, Kevin ; Murray, Louise ; van Herk, Marcel ; Henry, Ann. / The advanced radiotherapy network (ART-NET) UK lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy survey : national provision and a focus on image guidance. In: The British journal of radiology. 2019 ; pp. 20180988.

Bibtex

@article{1c1df0ef0a74474094e503a3840ef63c,
title = "The advanced radiotherapy network (ART-NET) UK lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy survey: national provision and a focus on image guidance",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE:: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become the standard of care for suitable patients with peripherally located early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Lung SABR requires strict image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocols to ensure its safe delivery. The aim of this survey was to provide an assessment of current lung SABR practice in the UK.METHODS:: An online semi-structured survey containing a maximum of 32 questions regarding lung SABR, focussing on treatment image verification processes was piloted, developed and disseminated to the radiotherapy managers of 62 National Health Service centres across the UK.RESULTS:: The survey had a 100 {\%} complete response from NHS centres. 36 centres (58{\%}) currently deliver lung SABR, with half treating fewer than 50 patients per year. Six centres deliver SABR despite not being commissioned by the NHS to provide this service. There is wide variation in the use of IGRT. Eight different permutations of cone beam CT order within the workflow were reported. Almost half of lung centres (17/36, 47{\%}) believe there is a need to update national image guidance associated with lung SABR, such as the use of 'day zero', mid treatment and post treatment cone beam CTs.CONCLUSION:: Our results demonstrate wide variation in IGRT for lung SABR. There is an opportunity to develop existing IGRT workflows and the optimal approach to image guidance. Further work is required to investigate lung SABR provision and potential barriers to its implementation.ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE:: This survey represents the most comprehensive and accurate assessment of lung SABR practice in the UK since the 2014 SABR consortium survey.",
author = "Matthew Beasley and Sean Brown and Helen McNair and Corinne Faivre-Finn and Kevin Franks and Louise Murray and {van Herk}, Marcel and Ann Henry",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1259/bjr.20180988",
language = "English",
pages = "20180988",
journal = "British Journal of Radiology",
issn = "0007-1285",
publisher = "British Institute of Radiology",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The advanced radiotherapy network (ART-NET) UK lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy survey

T2 - national provision and a focus on image guidance

AU - Beasley, Matthew

AU - Brown, Sean

AU - McNair, Helen

AU - Faivre-Finn, Corinne

AU - Franks, Kevin

AU - Murray, Louise

AU - van Herk, Marcel

AU - Henry, Ann

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - OBJECTIVE:: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become the standard of care for suitable patients with peripherally located early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Lung SABR requires strict image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocols to ensure its safe delivery. The aim of this survey was to provide an assessment of current lung SABR practice in the UK.METHODS:: An online semi-structured survey containing a maximum of 32 questions regarding lung SABR, focussing on treatment image verification processes was piloted, developed and disseminated to the radiotherapy managers of 62 National Health Service centres across the UK.RESULTS:: The survey had a 100 % complete response from NHS centres. 36 centres (58%) currently deliver lung SABR, with half treating fewer than 50 patients per year. Six centres deliver SABR despite not being commissioned by the NHS to provide this service. There is wide variation in the use of IGRT. Eight different permutations of cone beam CT order within the workflow were reported. Almost half of lung centres (17/36, 47%) believe there is a need to update national image guidance associated with lung SABR, such as the use of 'day zero', mid treatment and post treatment cone beam CTs.CONCLUSION:: Our results demonstrate wide variation in IGRT for lung SABR. There is an opportunity to develop existing IGRT workflows and the optimal approach to image guidance. Further work is required to investigate lung SABR provision and potential barriers to its implementation.ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE:: This survey represents the most comprehensive and accurate assessment of lung SABR practice in the UK since the 2014 SABR consortium survey.

AB - OBJECTIVE:: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become the standard of care for suitable patients with peripherally located early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Lung SABR requires strict image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocols to ensure its safe delivery. The aim of this survey was to provide an assessment of current lung SABR practice in the UK.METHODS:: An online semi-structured survey containing a maximum of 32 questions regarding lung SABR, focussing on treatment image verification processes was piloted, developed and disseminated to the radiotherapy managers of 62 National Health Service centres across the UK.RESULTS:: The survey had a 100 % complete response from NHS centres. 36 centres (58%) currently deliver lung SABR, with half treating fewer than 50 patients per year. Six centres deliver SABR despite not being commissioned by the NHS to provide this service. There is wide variation in the use of IGRT. Eight different permutations of cone beam CT order within the workflow were reported. Almost half of lung centres (17/36, 47%) believe there is a need to update national image guidance associated with lung SABR, such as the use of 'day zero', mid treatment and post treatment cone beam CTs.CONCLUSION:: Our results demonstrate wide variation in IGRT for lung SABR. There is an opportunity to develop existing IGRT workflows and the optimal approach to image guidance. Further work is required to investigate lung SABR provision and potential barriers to its implementation.ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE:: This survey represents the most comprehensive and accurate assessment of lung SABR practice in the UK since the 2014 SABR consortium survey.

U2 - 10.1259/bjr.20180988

DO - 10.1259/bjr.20180988

M3 - Article

SP - 20180988

JO - British Journal of Radiology

JF - British Journal of Radiology

SN - 0007-1285

ER -