Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder.Citation formats

  • External authors:
  • E Pulcu
  • P D Trotter
  • E J Thomas
  • M McFarquhar
  • B J Sahakian
  • R Zahn

Standard

Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder. / Pulcu, E; Trotter, P D; Thomas, E J; McFarquhar, M; Juhasz, G; Sahakian, B J; Deakin, J F W; Zahn, R; Anderson, I M; Elliott, R; Haggis, Beverley.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 9, 07.2014, p. 1825-1834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Pulcu, E, Trotter, PD, Thomas, EJ, McFarquhar, M, Juhasz, G, Sahakian, BJ, Deakin, JFW, Zahn, R, Anderson, IM, Elliott, R & Haggis, B 2014, 'Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder.', Psychological Medicine, vol. 44, no. 9, pp. 1825-1834. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291713002584

APA

Pulcu, E., Trotter, P. D., Thomas, E. J., McFarquhar, M., Juhasz, G., Sahakian, B. J., ... Haggis, B. (2014). Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder. Psychological Medicine, 44(9), 1825-1834. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291713002584

Vancouver

Pulcu E, Trotter PD, Thomas EJ, McFarquhar M, Juhasz G, Sahakian BJ et al. Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder. Psychological Medicine. 2014 Jul;44(9):1825-1834. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291713002584

Author

Pulcu, E ; Trotter, P D ; Thomas, E J ; McFarquhar, M ; Juhasz, G ; Sahakian, B J ; Deakin, J F W ; Zahn, R ; Anderson, I M ; Elliott, R ; Haggis, Beverley. / Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder. In: Psychological Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 44, No. 9. pp. 1825-1834.

Bibtex

@article{acc7b092d0694b838a570194ae958bae,
title = "Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with abnormalities in financial reward processing. Previous research suggests that patients with MDD show reduced sensitivity to frequency of financial rewards. However, there is a lack of conclusive evidence from studies investigating the evaluation of financial rewards over time, an important aspect of reward processing that influences the way people plan long-term investments. Beck's cognitive model posits that patients with MDD hold a negative view of the future that may influence the amount of resources patients are willing to invest into their future selves. METHOD: We administered a delay discounting task to 82 participants: 29 healthy controls, 29 unmedicated participants with fully remitted MDD (rMDD) and 24 participants with current MDD (11 on medication). RESULTS: Patients with current MDD, relative to remitted patients and healthy subjects, discounted large-sized future rewards at a significantly higher rate and were insensitive to changes in reward size from medium to large. There was a main effect of clinical group on discounting rates for large-sized rewards, and discounting rates for large-sized rewards correlated with severity of depressive symptoms, particularly hopelessness. CONCLUSIONS: Higher discounting of delayed rewards in MDD seems to be state dependent and may be a reflection of depressive symptoms, specifically hopelessness. Discounting distant rewards at a higher rate means that patients are more likely to choose immediate financial options. Such impairments related to long-term investment planning may be important for understanding value-based decision making in MDD, and contribute to ongoing functional impairment.",
keywords = "hopelessness, Key words Delay discounting, major depressive disorder, reward processing",
author = "E Pulcu and Trotter, {P D} and Thomas, {E J} and M McFarquhar and G Juhasz and Sahakian, {B J} and Deakin, {J F W} and R Zahn and Anderson, {I M} and R Elliott and Beverley Haggis",
note = "G0900593, Medical Research Council, United KingdomG0900593, Medical Research Council, United KingdomG0902304, Medical Research Council, United Kingdom",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291713002584",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "1825--1834",
journal = "Psychological Medicine, accepted 9 December 2014",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder.

AU - Pulcu, E

AU - Trotter, P D

AU - Thomas, E J

AU - McFarquhar, M

AU - Juhasz, G

AU - Sahakian, B J

AU - Deakin, J F W

AU - Zahn, R

AU - Anderson, I M

AU - Elliott, R

AU - Haggis, Beverley

N1 - G0900593, Medical Research Council, United KingdomG0900593, Medical Research Council, United KingdomG0902304, Medical Research Council, United Kingdom

PY - 2014/7

Y1 - 2014/7

N2 - BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with abnormalities in financial reward processing. Previous research suggests that patients with MDD show reduced sensitivity to frequency of financial rewards. However, there is a lack of conclusive evidence from studies investigating the evaluation of financial rewards over time, an important aspect of reward processing that influences the way people plan long-term investments. Beck's cognitive model posits that patients with MDD hold a negative view of the future that may influence the amount of resources patients are willing to invest into their future selves. METHOD: We administered a delay discounting task to 82 participants: 29 healthy controls, 29 unmedicated participants with fully remitted MDD (rMDD) and 24 participants with current MDD (11 on medication). RESULTS: Patients with current MDD, relative to remitted patients and healthy subjects, discounted large-sized future rewards at a significantly higher rate and were insensitive to changes in reward size from medium to large. There was a main effect of clinical group on discounting rates for large-sized rewards, and discounting rates for large-sized rewards correlated with severity of depressive symptoms, particularly hopelessness. CONCLUSIONS: Higher discounting of delayed rewards in MDD seems to be state dependent and may be a reflection of depressive symptoms, specifically hopelessness. Discounting distant rewards at a higher rate means that patients are more likely to choose immediate financial options. Such impairments related to long-term investment planning may be important for understanding value-based decision making in MDD, and contribute to ongoing functional impairment.

AB - BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with abnormalities in financial reward processing. Previous research suggests that patients with MDD show reduced sensitivity to frequency of financial rewards. However, there is a lack of conclusive evidence from studies investigating the evaluation of financial rewards over time, an important aspect of reward processing that influences the way people plan long-term investments. Beck's cognitive model posits that patients with MDD hold a negative view of the future that may influence the amount of resources patients are willing to invest into their future selves. METHOD: We administered a delay discounting task to 82 participants: 29 healthy controls, 29 unmedicated participants with fully remitted MDD (rMDD) and 24 participants with current MDD (11 on medication). RESULTS: Patients with current MDD, relative to remitted patients and healthy subjects, discounted large-sized future rewards at a significantly higher rate and were insensitive to changes in reward size from medium to large. There was a main effect of clinical group on discounting rates for large-sized rewards, and discounting rates for large-sized rewards correlated with severity of depressive symptoms, particularly hopelessness. CONCLUSIONS: Higher discounting of delayed rewards in MDD seems to be state dependent and may be a reflection of depressive symptoms, specifically hopelessness. Discounting distant rewards at a higher rate means that patients are more likely to choose immediate financial options. Such impairments related to long-term investment planning may be important for understanding value-based decision making in MDD, and contribute to ongoing functional impairment.

KW - hopelessness

KW - Key words Delay discounting

KW - major depressive disorder

KW - reward processing

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291713002584

DO - 10.1017/S0033291713002584

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 1825

EP - 1834

JO - Psychological Medicine, accepted 9 December 2014

JF - Psychological Medicine, accepted 9 December 2014

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 9

ER -