Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone studentsCitation formats

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Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students. / Alganami, F; Varese, Filippo; Wagstaff, G.F.; Bentall, Richard P.

In: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2017, p. 159-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Alganami, F, Varese, F, Wagstaff, GF & Bentall, RP 2017, 'Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students', Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 159-174. https://doi.org/10.1080/13546805.2017.1294056

APA

Alganami, F., Varese, F., Wagstaff, G. F., & Bentall, R. P. (2017). Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 22(2), 159-174. https://doi.org/10.1080/13546805.2017.1294056

Vancouver

Author

Alganami, F ; Varese, Filippo ; Wagstaff, G.F. ; Bentall, Richard P. / Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students. In: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 159-174.

Bibtex

@article{bcf0c1a62b0b495688fa040179105627,
title = "Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students",
abstract = "Introduction: Auditory hallucinations are associated with signal detection biases. We examine the extent to which suggestions influence performance on a signal detection task (SDT) in highly hallucination-prone and low hallucination-prone students. We also explore the relationship between trait suggestibility, dissociation and hallucination proneness.Method: In two experiments, students completed on-line measures of hallucination proneness (the revised Launay–Slade Hallucination Scale; LSHS-R), trait suggestibility (Inventory of Suggestibility) and dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale-II). Students in the upper and lower tertiles of the LSHS-R performed an auditory SDT. Prior to the task, suggestions were made pertaining to the number of expected targets (Experiment 1, N = 60: high vs. low suggestions; Experiment 2, N = 62, no suggestion vs. high suggestion vs. no voice suggestion).Results: Correlational and regression analyses indicated that trait suggestibility and dissociation predicted hallucination proneness. Highly hallucination-prone students showed a higher SDT bias in both studies. In Experiment 1, both bias scores were significantly affected by suggestions to the same degree. In Experiment 2, highly hallucination-prone students were more reactive to the high suggestion condition than the controls.Conclusion: Suggestions may affect source-monitoring judgments, and this effect may be greater in those who have a predisposition towards hallucinatory experiences.",
author = "F Alganami and Filippo Varese and G.F. Wagstaff and Bentall, {Richard P}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1080/13546805.2017.1294056",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "159--174",
journal = "Cognitive Neuropsychiatry",
issn = "1354-6805",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students

AU - Alganami, F

AU - Varese, Filippo

AU - Wagstaff, G.F.

AU - Bentall, Richard P

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Introduction: Auditory hallucinations are associated with signal detection biases. We examine the extent to which suggestions influence performance on a signal detection task (SDT) in highly hallucination-prone and low hallucination-prone students. We also explore the relationship between trait suggestibility, dissociation and hallucination proneness.Method: In two experiments, students completed on-line measures of hallucination proneness (the revised Launay–Slade Hallucination Scale; LSHS-R), trait suggestibility (Inventory of Suggestibility) and dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale-II). Students in the upper and lower tertiles of the LSHS-R performed an auditory SDT. Prior to the task, suggestions were made pertaining to the number of expected targets (Experiment 1, N = 60: high vs. low suggestions; Experiment 2, N = 62, no suggestion vs. high suggestion vs. no voice suggestion).Results: Correlational and regression analyses indicated that trait suggestibility and dissociation predicted hallucination proneness. Highly hallucination-prone students showed a higher SDT bias in both studies. In Experiment 1, both bias scores were significantly affected by suggestions to the same degree. In Experiment 2, highly hallucination-prone students were more reactive to the high suggestion condition than the controls.Conclusion: Suggestions may affect source-monitoring judgments, and this effect may be greater in those who have a predisposition towards hallucinatory experiences.

AB - Introduction: Auditory hallucinations are associated with signal detection biases. We examine the extent to which suggestions influence performance on a signal detection task (SDT) in highly hallucination-prone and low hallucination-prone students. We also explore the relationship between trait suggestibility, dissociation and hallucination proneness.Method: In two experiments, students completed on-line measures of hallucination proneness (the revised Launay–Slade Hallucination Scale; LSHS-R), trait suggestibility (Inventory of Suggestibility) and dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale-II). Students in the upper and lower tertiles of the LSHS-R performed an auditory SDT. Prior to the task, suggestions were made pertaining to the number of expected targets (Experiment 1, N = 60: high vs. low suggestions; Experiment 2, N = 62, no suggestion vs. high suggestion vs. no voice suggestion).Results: Correlational and regression analyses indicated that trait suggestibility and dissociation predicted hallucination proneness. Highly hallucination-prone students showed a higher SDT bias in both studies. In Experiment 1, both bias scores were significantly affected by suggestions to the same degree. In Experiment 2, highly hallucination-prone students were more reactive to the high suggestion condition than the controls.Conclusion: Suggestions may affect source-monitoring judgments, and this effect may be greater in those who have a predisposition towards hallucinatory experiences.

U2 - 10.1080/13546805.2017.1294056

DO - 10.1080/13546805.2017.1294056

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 159

EP - 174

JO - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

JF - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

SN - 1354-6805

IS - 2

ER -