Social media and its relationship with mood, self-esteem and paranoia in psychosis.Citation formats

Standard

Social media and its relationship with mood, self-esteem and paranoia in psychosis. / Berry, Natalie; Emsley, Richard; Lobban, Fiona; Bucci, Sandra.

In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Vol. 138, No. 6, 12.2018, p. 558-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Berry, N, Emsley, R, Lobban, F & Bucci, S 2018, 'Social media and its relationship with mood, self-esteem and paranoia in psychosis.', Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, vol. 138, no. 6, pp. 558-570. https://doi.org/10.1111/acps.12953

APA

Vancouver

Author

Berry, Natalie ; Emsley, Richard ; Lobban, Fiona ; Bucci, Sandra. / Social media and its relationship with mood, self-esteem and paranoia in psychosis. In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 2018 ; Vol. 138, No. 6. pp. 558-570.

Bibtex

@article{fc789cf7a7604c7886eaddeb01f84db1,
title = "Social media and its relationship with mood, self-esteem and paranoia in psychosis.",
abstract = "Objective. An evidence-base is emerging indicating detrimental and beneficial effects of social media. Little is known about the impact of social media use on people who experience psychosis Method. Forty-four participants with and without psychosis completed 1084 assessments of social media use, perceived social rank, mood, self-esteem and paranoia over a 6-day period using an experience sampling method (ESM). Results. Social media use predicted low mood, but did not predict self-esteem and paranoia. Posting about feelings and venting on social media predicted low mood and self-esteem and high paranoia, whilst posting about daily activities predicted increases in positive affect and self-esteem and viewing social media newsfeeds predicted reductions in negative affect and paranoia. Perceptions of low social rank when using social media predicted low mood and self-esteem and high paranoia. The impact of social media use did not differ between participants with and without psychosis; although, experiencing psychosis moderated the relationship between venting and negative affect. Social media use frequency was lower in people with psychosis. Conclusion. Findings show the potential detrimental impact of social media use for people with and without psychosis. Despite few between-group differences, overall negative psychological consequences highlight the need to consider use in clinical practice",
keywords = "bipolar disorder, psychosis, Schizophrenia, behaviour",
author = "Natalie Berry and Richard Emsley and Fiona Lobban and Sandra Bucci",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1111/acps.12953",
language = "English",
volume = "138",
pages = "558--570",
journal = "Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.",
issn = "0001-690X",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social media and its relationship with mood, self-esteem and paranoia in psychosis.

AU - Berry, Natalie

AU - Emsley, Richard

AU - Lobban, Fiona

AU - Bucci, Sandra

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - Objective. An evidence-base is emerging indicating detrimental and beneficial effects of social media. Little is known about the impact of social media use on people who experience psychosis Method. Forty-four participants with and without psychosis completed 1084 assessments of social media use, perceived social rank, mood, self-esteem and paranoia over a 6-day period using an experience sampling method (ESM). Results. Social media use predicted low mood, but did not predict self-esteem and paranoia. Posting about feelings and venting on social media predicted low mood and self-esteem and high paranoia, whilst posting about daily activities predicted increases in positive affect and self-esteem and viewing social media newsfeeds predicted reductions in negative affect and paranoia. Perceptions of low social rank when using social media predicted low mood and self-esteem and high paranoia. The impact of social media use did not differ between participants with and without psychosis; although, experiencing psychosis moderated the relationship between venting and negative affect. Social media use frequency was lower in people with psychosis. Conclusion. Findings show the potential detrimental impact of social media use for people with and without psychosis. Despite few between-group differences, overall negative psychological consequences highlight the need to consider use in clinical practice

AB - Objective. An evidence-base is emerging indicating detrimental and beneficial effects of social media. Little is known about the impact of social media use on people who experience psychosis Method. Forty-four participants with and without psychosis completed 1084 assessments of social media use, perceived social rank, mood, self-esteem and paranoia over a 6-day period using an experience sampling method (ESM). Results. Social media use predicted low mood, but did not predict self-esteem and paranoia. Posting about feelings and venting on social media predicted low mood and self-esteem and high paranoia, whilst posting about daily activities predicted increases in positive affect and self-esteem and viewing social media newsfeeds predicted reductions in negative affect and paranoia. Perceptions of low social rank when using social media predicted low mood and self-esteem and high paranoia. The impact of social media use did not differ between participants with and without psychosis; although, experiencing psychosis moderated the relationship between venting and negative affect. Social media use frequency was lower in people with psychosis. Conclusion. Findings show the potential detrimental impact of social media use for people with and without psychosis. Despite few between-group differences, overall negative psychological consequences highlight the need to consider use in clinical practice

KW - bipolar disorder

KW - psychosis

KW - Schizophrenia

KW - behaviour

U2 - 10.1111/acps.12953

DO - 10.1111/acps.12953

M3 - Article

VL - 138

SP - 558

EP - 570

JO - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.

JF - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.

SN - 0001-690X

IS - 6

ER -