SMALL PARALLEL CORPORA IN AN ENGLISH-ARABIC TRANSLATION CLASSROOM: NO NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATIONCitation formats

  • Authors:
  • Hammouda Salhi
  • Said M Shiyab (Editor)
  • Marilyn Gaddis Rose (Editor)
  • Juliane House (Editor)

Standard

SMALL PARALLEL CORPORA IN AN ENGLISH-ARABIC TRANSLATION CLASSROOM: NO NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION. / Salhi, Hammouda; Shiyab, Said M (Editor); Rose, Marilyn Gaddis (Editor); House, Juliane (Editor).

Globalization and Aspects of Translation. ed. / Said M Shiyab; Marilyn Gaddis Rose; Juliane House. UK. : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Harvard

Salhi, H, Shiyab, SM (ed.), Rose, MG (ed.) & House, J (ed.) 2010, SMALL PARALLEL CORPORA IN AN ENGLISH-ARABIC TRANSLATION CLASSROOM: NO NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION. in SM Shiyab, MG Rose & J House (eds), Globalization and Aspects of Translation. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, UK., 1st International Conference on Translation/ Interpretation & the Impact of Globalization, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, 18/11/08.

APA

Salhi, H., Shiyab, S. M. (Ed.), Rose, M. G. (Ed.), & House, J. (Ed.) (2010). SMALL PARALLEL CORPORA IN AN ENGLISH-ARABIC TRANSLATION CLASSROOM: NO NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION. In S. M. Shiyab, M. G. Rose, & J. House (Eds.), Globalization and Aspects of Translation Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Vancouver

Salhi H, Shiyab SM, (ed.), Rose MG, (ed.), House J, (ed.). SMALL PARALLEL CORPORA IN AN ENGLISH-ARABIC TRANSLATION CLASSROOM: NO NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION. In Shiyab SM, Rose MG, House J, editors, Globalization and Aspects of Translation. UK.: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 2010

Author

Salhi, Hammouda ; Shiyab, Said M (Editor) ; Rose, Marilyn Gaddis (Editor) ; House, Juliane (Editor). / SMALL PARALLEL CORPORA IN AN ENGLISH-ARABIC TRANSLATION CLASSROOM: NO NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION. Globalization and Aspects of Translation. editor / Said M Shiyab ; Marilyn Gaddis Rose ; Juliane House. UK. : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010.

Bibtex

@inproceedings{01f57810e449438db959d8c82fee3ebc,
title = "SMALL PARALLEL CORPORA IN AN ENGLISH-ARABIC TRANSLATION CLASSROOM: NO NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION",
abstract = "One of the main advantages brought about by technology is the easy and quick access to electronic texts (Zanettin, 2002) as well as their availability on a large scale, whereas in the past only printed texts were available. Electronic texts can be easily retrieved, parsed, concordanced and aligned not only for translation research and practice, but also for translation teaching and learning. Using parallel (or translation) corpora in translation classrooms has now become common practice amongst translation teachers and students in the West. They are designed to make students familiar with the genres of texts to be translated and, thus, to enhance their understanding of source texts and improve their usage of target words (and terminology). In fact students are now confronted with copious amounts of both original texts and their associated translations (Zanettin, 1998), which will help them in their translation tasks, save them time, make their assignments more interesting, and also prevent them from reinventing the wheel. In this paper I will report on an experiment that was carried out at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of Sousse with undergraduate students to demonstrate how small parallel (and comparable) corpora can be used to enhance the fluency and professionalism of trainee translators and facilitate teaching and learning processes on the basis of a collaborative approach to the translation exercise (Bowker, 2002, author???s term). Small English-Arabic parallel corpora and other small comparable corpora taken, mainly, from United Nations texts, which can be regarded as reliable in an era where reliability has become questionable, are presented as an example of translation corpora used in the translation classroom. The findings showed an improvement in students??? translation skills and translation output.",
keywords = "Translation studies, Parallel corpora, Technology, Collaboration, translation teaching, Arabic",
author = "Hammouda Salhi and Shiyab, {Said M} and Rose, {Marilyn Gaddis} and Juliane House",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
editor = "Shiyab, {Said M} and Rose, {Marilyn Gaddis} and Juliane House",
booktitle = "Globalization and Aspects of Translation",
publisher = "Cambridge Scholars Publishing",
address = "United Kingdom",
note = "1st International Conference on Translation/ Interpretation & the Impact of Globalization ; Conference date: 18-11-2008 Through 20-11-2008",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - SMALL PARALLEL CORPORA IN AN ENGLISH-ARABIC TRANSLATION CLASSROOM: NO NEED TO REINVENT THE WHEEL IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION

AU - Salhi, Hammouda

A2 - Shiyab, Said M

A2 - Rose, Marilyn Gaddis

A2 - House, Juliane

A2 - Shiyab, Said M

A2 - Rose, Marilyn Gaddis

A2 - House, Juliane

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - One of the main advantages brought about by technology is the easy and quick access to electronic texts (Zanettin, 2002) as well as their availability on a large scale, whereas in the past only printed texts were available. Electronic texts can be easily retrieved, parsed, concordanced and aligned not only for translation research and practice, but also for translation teaching and learning. Using parallel (or translation) corpora in translation classrooms has now become common practice amongst translation teachers and students in the West. They are designed to make students familiar with the genres of texts to be translated and, thus, to enhance their understanding of source texts and improve their usage of target words (and terminology). In fact students are now confronted with copious amounts of both original texts and their associated translations (Zanettin, 1998), which will help them in their translation tasks, save them time, make their assignments more interesting, and also prevent them from reinventing the wheel. In this paper I will report on an experiment that was carried out at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of Sousse with undergraduate students to demonstrate how small parallel (and comparable) corpora can be used to enhance the fluency and professionalism of trainee translators and facilitate teaching and learning processes on the basis of a collaborative approach to the translation exercise (Bowker, 2002, author???s term). Small English-Arabic parallel corpora and other small comparable corpora taken, mainly, from United Nations texts, which can be regarded as reliable in an era where reliability has become questionable, are presented as an example of translation corpora used in the translation classroom. The findings showed an improvement in students??? translation skills and translation output.

AB - One of the main advantages brought about by technology is the easy and quick access to electronic texts (Zanettin, 2002) as well as their availability on a large scale, whereas in the past only printed texts were available. Electronic texts can be easily retrieved, parsed, concordanced and aligned not only for translation research and practice, but also for translation teaching and learning. Using parallel (or translation) corpora in translation classrooms has now become common practice amongst translation teachers and students in the West. They are designed to make students familiar with the genres of texts to be translated and, thus, to enhance their understanding of source texts and improve their usage of target words (and terminology). In fact students are now confronted with copious amounts of both original texts and their associated translations (Zanettin, 1998), which will help them in their translation tasks, save them time, make their assignments more interesting, and also prevent them from reinventing the wheel. In this paper I will report on an experiment that was carried out at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities of Sousse with undergraduate students to demonstrate how small parallel (and comparable) corpora can be used to enhance the fluency and professionalism of trainee translators and facilitate teaching and learning processes on the basis of a collaborative approach to the translation exercise (Bowker, 2002, author???s term). Small English-Arabic parallel corpora and other small comparable corpora taken, mainly, from United Nations texts, which can be regarded as reliable in an era where reliability has become questionable, are presented as an example of translation corpora used in the translation classroom. The findings showed an improvement in students??? translation skills and translation output.

KW - Translation studies, Parallel corpora, Technology, Collaboration, translation teaching, Arabic

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Globalization and Aspects of Translation

PB - Cambridge Scholars Publishing

CY - UK.

T2 - 1st International Conference on Translation/ Interpretation & the Impact of Globalization

Y2 - 18 November 2008 through 20 November 2008

ER -