Semantics of the Transitive Construction: Prototype Effects and Developmental ComparisonsCitation formats

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Semantics of the Transitive Construction: Prototype Effects and Developmental Comparisons. / Ibbotson, Paul; Theakston, Anna L.; Lieven, Elena V M; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Cognitive Science, Vol. 36, No. 7, 09.2012, p. 1268-1288.

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Ibbotson, Paul ; Theakston, Anna L. ; Lieven, Elena V M ; Tomasello, Michael. / Semantics of the Transitive Construction: Prototype Effects and Developmental Comparisons. In: Cognitive Science. 2012 ; Vol. 36, No. 7. pp. 1268-1288.

Bibtex

@article{00f707d1b44748f989e0bf92d98f7b4e,
title = "Semantics of the Transitive Construction: Prototype Effects and Developmental Comparisons",
abstract = "This paper investigates whether an abstract linguistic construction shows the kind of prototype effects characteristic of non-linguistic categories, in both adults and young children. Adapting the prototype-plus-distortion methodology of Franks and Bransford (1971), we found that whereas adults were lured toward false-positive recognition of sentences with prototypical transitive semantics, young children showed no such effect. We examined two main implications of the results. First, it adds a novel data point to a growing body of research in cognitive linguistics and construction grammar that shows abstract linguistic categories can behave in similar ways to non-linguistic categories, for example, by showing graded membership of a category. Thus, the findings lend psychological validity to the existing cross-linguistic evidence for prototypical transitive semantics. Second, we discuss a possible explanation for the fact that prototypical sentences were processed differently in adults and children, namely, that children's transitive semantic network is not as interconnected or cognitively coherent as adults'. {\textcopyright} 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.",
keywords = "Categorization, Grammar, Prototype, Semantics",
author = "Paul Ibbotson and Theakston, {Anna L.} and Lieven, {Elena V M} and Michael Tomasello",
note = "Funded by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology",
year = "2012",
month = sep
doi = "10.1111/j.1551-6709.2012.01249.x",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "1268--1288",
journal = "Cognitive Science",
issn = "0364-0213",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Semantics of the Transitive Construction: Prototype Effects and Developmental Comparisons

AU - Ibbotson, Paul

AU - Theakston, Anna L.

AU - Lieven, Elena V M

AU - Tomasello, Michael

N1 - Funded by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - This paper investigates whether an abstract linguistic construction shows the kind of prototype effects characteristic of non-linguistic categories, in both adults and young children. Adapting the prototype-plus-distortion methodology of Franks and Bransford (1971), we found that whereas adults were lured toward false-positive recognition of sentences with prototypical transitive semantics, young children showed no such effect. We examined two main implications of the results. First, it adds a novel data point to a growing body of research in cognitive linguistics and construction grammar that shows abstract linguistic categories can behave in similar ways to non-linguistic categories, for example, by showing graded membership of a category. Thus, the findings lend psychological validity to the existing cross-linguistic evidence for prototypical transitive semantics. Second, we discuss a possible explanation for the fact that prototypical sentences were processed differently in adults and children, namely, that children's transitive semantic network is not as interconnected or cognitively coherent as adults'. © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

AB - This paper investigates whether an abstract linguistic construction shows the kind of prototype effects characteristic of non-linguistic categories, in both adults and young children. Adapting the prototype-plus-distortion methodology of Franks and Bransford (1971), we found that whereas adults were lured toward false-positive recognition of sentences with prototypical transitive semantics, young children showed no such effect. We examined two main implications of the results. First, it adds a novel data point to a growing body of research in cognitive linguistics and construction grammar that shows abstract linguistic categories can behave in similar ways to non-linguistic categories, for example, by showing graded membership of a category. Thus, the findings lend psychological validity to the existing cross-linguistic evidence for prototypical transitive semantics. Second, we discuss a possible explanation for the fact that prototypical sentences were processed differently in adults and children, namely, that children's transitive semantic network is not as interconnected or cognitively coherent as adults'. © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

KW - Categorization

KW - Grammar

KW - Prototype

KW - Semantics

U2 - 10.1111/j.1551-6709.2012.01249.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1551-6709.2012.01249.x

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 1268

EP - 1288

JO - Cognitive Science

JF - Cognitive Science

SN - 0364-0213

IS - 7

ER -