ScrapbooksCitation formats

Standard

Scrapbooks : A proliferation of meaning. / Moss, Eloise.

Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance. ed. / Sarah Barber; Corinna Peniston-Bird. Taylor & Francis, 2020.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Harvard

Moss, E 2020, Scrapbooks: A proliferation of meaning. in S Barber & C Peniston-Bird (eds), Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance. Taylor & Francis. <https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781351106573/chapters/10.4324/9781351106573-13>

APA

Moss, E. (2020). Scrapbooks: A proliferation of meaning. In S. Barber, & C. Peniston-Bird (Eds.), Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance Taylor & Francis. https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781351106573/chapters/10.4324/9781351106573-13

Vancouver

Moss E. Scrapbooks: A proliferation of meaning. In Barber S, Peniston-Bird C, editors, Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance. Taylor & Francis. 2020

Author

Moss, Eloise. / Scrapbooks : A proliferation of meaning. Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts: Space, Time and Performance. editor / Sarah Barber ; Corinna Peniston-Bird. Taylor & Francis, 2020.

Bibtex

@inbook{302bc616091043d9b241a4e7087e8130,
title = "Scrapbooks: A proliferation of meaning",
abstract = "This chapter will explore how historians can {\textquoteleft}read{\textquoteright} scrapbooks, a form of primary source that represents a fusion of cuttings, images, and annotations that may have been deeply personal to its creator, while also offering glimpses into the circulation of ideas at professional, local, and national levels. Our case study will be the scrapbooks created by Detective Frederick Porter Wensley, Head of the Criminal Investigation Department at Scotland Yard, whose career began as a {\textquoteleft}bobby on the beat{\textquoteright} in East London during the 1880s until his retirement as a celebrated sleuth of international renown in 1929. Held at the Bishopsgate Institute Archives, these scrapbooks offer fascinating insights into Wensley{\textquoteright}s consciousness of his own emerging celebrity, manifested through charting his presence in press cuttings over time and carefully collating these in his scrapbooks to form a {\textquoteleft}narrative.{\textquoteright} We will explore the ways in which he juxtaposed these texts with photographs and other ephemera from his professional and personal life to navigate experience and representation, eventually distilling facets of these textual interactions into his published autobiography Detective Days (1931). But just how far can we access Wensley{\textquoteright}s private thoughts from this kind of source, constituted primarily of others{\textquoteright} writings? And to what extent are we in danger of {\textquoteleft}overlaying{\textquoteright} a particular interpretation onto the proximity of different texts that may have simply been pasted alongside one another haphazardly, or for reasons of space? The chapter will deploy concepts like Judith Walkowitz{\textquoteright}s assertion of newspaper editorial choices creating a {\textquoteleft}proliferation of meaning{\textquoteright} on the page, as well as comparative analyses between international studies of scrapbooks produced throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, to explore the different ways we can {\textquoteleft}read{\textquoteright} these texts.",
author = "Eloise Moss",
year = "2020",
month = apr,
day = "13",
language = "English",
editor = "Sarah Barber and Corinna Peniston-Bird",
booktitle = "Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Scrapbooks

T2 - A proliferation of meaning

AU - Moss, Eloise

PY - 2020/4/13

Y1 - 2020/4/13

N2 - This chapter will explore how historians can ‘read’ scrapbooks, a form of primary source that represents a fusion of cuttings, images, and annotations that may have been deeply personal to its creator, while also offering glimpses into the circulation of ideas at professional, local, and national levels. Our case study will be the scrapbooks created by Detective Frederick Porter Wensley, Head of the Criminal Investigation Department at Scotland Yard, whose career began as a ‘bobby on the beat’ in East London during the 1880s until his retirement as a celebrated sleuth of international renown in 1929. Held at the Bishopsgate Institute Archives, these scrapbooks offer fascinating insights into Wensley’s consciousness of his own emerging celebrity, manifested through charting his presence in press cuttings over time and carefully collating these in his scrapbooks to form a ‘narrative.’ We will explore the ways in which he juxtaposed these texts with photographs and other ephemera from his professional and personal life to navigate experience and representation, eventually distilling facets of these textual interactions into his published autobiography Detective Days (1931). But just how far can we access Wensley’s private thoughts from this kind of source, constituted primarily of others’ writings? And to what extent are we in danger of ‘overlaying’ a particular interpretation onto the proximity of different texts that may have simply been pasted alongside one another haphazardly, or for reasons of space? The chapter will deploy concepts like Judith Walkowitz’s assertion of newspaper editorial choices creating a ‘proliferation of meaning’ on the page, as well as comparative analyses between international studies of scrapbooks produced throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, to explore the different ways we can ‘read’ these texts.

AB - This chapter will explore how historians can ‘read’ scrapbooks, a form of primary source that represents a fusion of cuttings, images, and annotations that may have been deeply personal to its creator, while also offering glimpses into the circulation of ideas at professional, local, and national levels. Our case study will be the scrapbooks created by Detective Frederick Porter Wensley, Head of the Criminal Investigation Department at Scotland Yard, whose career began as a ‘bobby on the beat’ in East London during the 1880s until his retirement as a celebrated sleuth of international renown in 1929. Held at the Bishopsgate Institute Archives, these scrapbooks offer fascinating insights into Wensley’s consciousness of his own emerging celebrity, manifested through charting his presence in press cuttings over time and carefully collating these in his scrapbooks to form a ‘narrative.’ We will explore the ways in which he juxtaposed these texts with photographs and other ephemera from his professional and personal life to navigate experience and representation, eventually distilling facets of these textual interactions into his published autobiography Detective Days (1931). But just how far can we access Wensley’s private thoughts from this kind of source, constituted primarily of others’ writings? And to what extent are we in danger of ‘overlaying’ a particular interpretation onto the proximity of different texts that may have simply been pasted alongside one another haphazardly, or for reasons of space? The chapter will deploy concepts like Judith Walkowitz’s assertion of newspaper editorial choices creating a ‘proliferation of meaning’ on the page, as well as comparative analyses between international studies of scrapbooks produced throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, to explore the different ways we can ‘read’ these texts.

M3 - Chapter

BT - Approaching Historical Sources in their Contexts

A2 - Barber, Sarah

A2 - Peniston-Bird, Corinna

PB - Taylor & Francis

ER -