Salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate versus fluticasone propionate plus montelukast: A randomised controlled trial investigating the effects on airway inflammation in asthmaCitation formats

  • Authors:
  • Ian Pavord
  • Ashley Woodcock
  • Debbie Parker
  • Leanne Rice

Standard

Salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate versus fluticasone propionate plus montelukast: A randomised controlled trial investigating the effects on airway inflammation in asthma. / Pavord, Ian; Woodcock, Ashley; Parker, Debbie; Rice, Leanne.

In: Respiratory research, Vol. 8, 67, 27.09.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{03fc440010f3474eb329cf6a180c2067,
title = "Salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate versus fluticasone propionate plus montelukast: A randomised controlled trial investigating the effects on airway inflammation in asthma",
abstract = "Background: Few studies have compared treatment strategies in patients with asthma poorly controlled on low dose inhaled corticosteroids, and little is known about the effects of different treatments on airway inflammation. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study, we compared the effects of salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate (FP) (Seretide™; SFC) and FP plus montelukast (FP/M) on sputum inflammatory markers, airway responsiveness, lung function, and symptoms in adult asthmatics.Methods: Sixty-six subjects were randomised to SFC or FP/M for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was changes in neutrophil, eosinophil, macrophage, lymphocyte, and epithelial cell levels in induced sputum. Additional outcomes included the change in other sputum markers of airway inflammation, airway responsiveness, symptom control, and lung function.Results: Both treatments had no significant effect on induced sputum inflammatory cells, although there was a trend for a reduction in sputum eosinophils. Both treatments significantly improved airway responsiveness, whereas SFC generally led to greater improvements in symptom control and lung function than FP/M. FP/M led to significantly greater reductions in sputum cysteinyl leukotrienes than SFC (treatment ratio 1.80; 95{\%} CI 1.09, 2.94).Conclusion: Both treatments led to similar control of eosinophilic airway inflammation, although PEF and symptom control were better with SFC.Study number: SAM40030 (SOLTA). {\circledC} 2007 Pavord et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.",
keywords = "adverse effects: Acetates, adverse effects: Adrenergic beta-Agonists, Adult, adverse effects: Albuterol, adverse effects: Androstadienes, adverse effects: Anti-Asthmatic Agents, drug therapy: Asthma, drug therapy: Bronchial Hyperreactivity, metabolism: Cysteine, Double-Blind Method, Drug Combinations, Female, drug effects: Forced Expiratory Volume, Great Britain, metabolism: Histamine, Humans, metabolism: Interleukin-8, adverse effects: Leukotriene Antagonists, metabolism: Leukotrienes, drug effects: Lung, Male, adverse effects: Quinolines, Spirometry, cytology: Sputum, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome",
author = "Ian Pavord and Ashley Woodcock and Debbie Parker and Leanne Rice",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1186/1465-9921-8-67",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Respiratory research",
issn = "1465-9921",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate versus fluticasone propionate plus montelukast: A randomised controlled trial investigating the effects on airway inflammation in asthma

AU - Pavord, Ian

AU - Woodcock, Ashley

AU - Parker, Debbie

AU - Rice, Leanne

PY - 2007/9/27

Y1 - 2007/9/27

N2 - Background: Few studies have compared treatment strategies in patients with asthma poorly controlled on low dose inhaled corticosteroids, and little is known about the effects of different treatments on airway inflammation. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study, we compared the effects of salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate (FP) (Seretide™; SFC) and FP plus montelukast (FP/M) on sputum inflammatory markers, airway responsiveness, lung function, and symptoms in adult asthmatics.Methods: Sixty-six subjects were randomised to SFC or FP/M for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was changes in neutrophil, eosinophil, macrophage, lymphocyte, and epithelial cell levels in induced sputum. Additional outcomes included the change in other sputum markers of airway inflammation, airway responsiveness, symptom control, and lung function.Results: Both treatments had no significant effect on induced sputum inflammatory cells, although there was a trend for a reduction in sputum eosinophils. Both treatments significantly improved airway responsiveness, whereas SFC generally led to greater improvements in symptom control and lung function than FP/M. FP/M led to significantly greater reductions in sputum cysteinyl leukotrienes than SFC (treatment ratio 1.80; 95% CI 1.09, 2.94).Conclusion: Both treatments led to similar control of eosinophilic airway inflammation, although PEF and symptom control were better with SFC.Study number: SAM40030 (SOLTA). © 2007 Pavord et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

AB - Background: Few studies have compared treatment strategies in patients with asthma poorly controlled on low dose inhaled corticosteroids, and little is known about the effects of different treatments on airway inflammation. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study, we compared the effects of salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate (FP) (Seretide™; SFC) and FP plus montelukast (FP/M) on sputum inflammatory markers, airway responsiveness, lung function, and symptoms in adult asthmatics.Methods: Sixty-six subjects were randomised to SFC or FP/M for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was changes in neutrophil, eosinophil, macrophage, lymphocyte, and epithelial cell levels in induced sputum. Additional outcomes included the change in other sputum markers of airway inflammation, airway responsiveness, symptom control, and lung function.Results: Both treatments had no significant effect on induced sputum inflammatory cells, although there was a trend for a reduction in sputum eosinophils. Both treatments significantly improved airway responsiveness, whereas SFC generally led to greater improvements in symptom control and lung function than FP/M. FP/M led to significantly greater reductions in sputum cysteinyl leukotrienes than SFC (treatment ratio 1.80; 95% CI 1.09, 2.94).Conclusion: Both treatments led to similar control of eosinophilic airway inflammation, although PEF and symptom control were better with SFC.Study number: SAM40030 (SOLTA). © 2007 Pavord et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

KW - adverse effects: Acetates

KW - adverse effects: Adrenergic beta-Agonists

KW - Adult

KW - adverse effects: Albuterol

KW - adverse effects: Androstadienes

KW - adverse effects: Anti-Asthmatic Agents

KW - drug therapy: Asthma

KW - drug therapy: Bronchial Hyperreactivity

KW - metabolism: Cysteine

KW - Double-Blind Method

KW - Drug Combinations

KW - Female

KW - drug effects: Forced Expiratory Volume

KW - Great Britain

KW - metabolism: Histamine

KW - Humans

KW - metabolism: Interleukin-8

KW - adverse effects: Leukotriene Antagonists

KW - metabolism: Leukotrienes

KW - drug effects: Lung

KW - Male

KW - adverse effects: Quinolines

KW - Spirometry

KW - cytology: Sputum

KW - Time Factors

KW - Treatment Outcome

U2 - 10.1186/1465-9921-8-67

DO - 10.1186/1465-9921-8-67

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Respiratory research

JF - Respiratory research

SN - 1465-9921

M1 - 67

ER -