Root parasite induced nitrogen transfer between plants is density dependentCitation formats

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Root parasite induced nitrogen transfer between plants is density dependent. / Dromph, Karsten M.; Cook, Roger; Ostle, Nick J.; Bardgett, Richard D.

In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, Vol. 38, No. 8, 08.2006, p. 2495-2498.

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Harvard

Dromph, KM, Cook, R, Ostle, NJ & Bardgett, RD 2006, 'Root parasite induced nitrogen transfer between plants is density dependent', Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 38, no. 8, pp. 2495-2498. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2006.02.005

APA

Dromph, K. M., Cook, R., Ostle, N. J., & Bardgett, R. D. (2006). Root parasite induced nitrogen transfer between plants is density dependent. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 38(8), 2495-2498. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2006.02.005

Vancouver

Author

Dromph, Karsten M. ; Cook, Roger ; Ostle, Nick J. ; Bardgett, Richard D. / Root parasite induced nitrogen transfer between plants is density dependent. In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 2006 ; Vol. 38, No. 8. pp. 2495-2498.

Bibtex

@article{28efb6aae4654adbbe7bd9642a3a3bfd,
title = "Root parasite induced nitrogen transfer between plants is density dependent",
abstract = "Recent studies point to the importance of soil borne parasites as agents of vegetation change via their negative effect on host plants. Here we show that these soil organisms can influence vegetation characteristics by increasing the transfer of the plant growth-limiting nutrient nitrogen (N) from their host, a N-fixing legume, to neighbouring grass species, thereby benefiting the growth of the neighbour. Furthermore, the amount of N transferred from the legume to the neighbour, and its consequent effect on the neighbours growth, was dependant on the density of root infestation. This mechanism of N transfer from legumes to neighbouring plant species is likely to be an important agent of vegetation change. {\circledC} 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Clover, Grassland, Legumes, Nitrogen, Plant-parasitic nematodes",
author = "Dromph, {Karsten M.} and Roger Cook and Ostle, {Nick J.} and Bardgett, {Richard D.}",
note = "Dromph, Karsten M. Cook, Roger Ostle, Nick J. Bardgett, Richard D.",
year = "2006",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.soilbio.2006.02.005",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "2495--2498",
journal = "Soil Biology & Biochemistry",
issn = "0038-0717",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Root parasite induced nitrogen transfer between plants is density dependent

AU - Dromph, Karsten M.

AU - Cook, Roger

AU - Ostle, Nick J.

AU - Bardgett, Richard D.

N1 - Dromph, Karsten M. Cook, Roger Ostle, Nick J. Bardgett, Richard D.

PY - 2006/8

Y1 - 2006/8

N2 - Recent studies point to the importance of soil borne parasites as agents of vegetation change via their negative effect on host plants. Here we show that these soil organisms can influence vegetation characteristics by increasing the transfer of the plant growth-limiting nutrient nitrogen (N) from their host, a N-fixing legume, to neighbouring grass species, thereby benefiting the growth of the neighbour. Furthermore, the amount of N transferred from the legume to the neighbour, and its consequent effect on the neighbours growth, was dependant on the density of root infestation. This mechanism of N transfer from legumes to neighbouring plant species is likely to be an important agent of vegetation change. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Recent studies point to the importance of soil borne parasites as agents of vegetation change via their negative effect on host plants. Here we show that these soil organisms can influence vegetation characteristics by increasing the transfer of the plant growth-limiting nutrient nitrogen (N) from their host, a N-fixing legume, to neighbouring grass species, thereby benefiting the growth of the neighbour. Furthermore, the amount of N transferred from the legume to the neighbour, and its consequent effect on the neighbours growth, was dependant on the density of root infestation. This mechanism of N transfer from legumes to neighbouring plant species is likely to be an important agent of vegetation change. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Clover

KW - Grassland

KW - Legumes

KW - Nitrogen

KW - Plant-parasitic nematodes

U2 - 10.1016/j.soilbio.2006.02.005

DO - 10.1016/j.soilbio.2006.02.005

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 2495

EP - 2498

JO - Soil Biology & Biochemistry

JF - Soil Biology & Biochemistry

SN - 0038-0717

IS - 8

ER -