Risks and benefits of nanotechnology: How young adults perceive possible advances in nanomedicine compared with conventional treatmentsCitation formats

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Risks and benefits of nanotechnology: How young adults perceive possible advances in nanomedicine compared with conventional treatments. / Nerlich, Brigitte; Clarke, David D.; Ulph, Fiona.

In: Health, Risk and Society, Vol. 9, No. 2, 06.2007, p. 159-171.

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Nerlich, Brigitte ; Clarke, David D. ; Ulph, Fiona. / Risks and benefits of nanotechnology: How young adults perceive possible advances in nanomedicine compared with conventional treatments. In: Health, Risk and Society. 2007 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 159-171.

Bibtex

@article{24969e9089a747dd9ac868aea4e4a953,
title = "Risks and benefits of nanotechnology: How young adults perceive possible advances in nanomedicine compared with conventional treatments",
abstract = "Attitudes to nanotechnology are widely studied and are changing fast. An experiment comparing young peoples' attitudes to nanomedicine and conventional treatment was conducted on 434 undergraduate students. They answered a number of questions about a hypothetical arthritis sufferer who was to be treated with a drug or a newly invented nanomedical technique, and requiring either one treatment or several. They were more influenced by the difference between one-shot and repeated treatments than by any difference between drug- and nanodelivery. Furthermore the two treatments that seemed most negative to participants were a drug that had to be administered repeatedly, or a nanosystem that was needed only once. Participants preferred the thought of a drug that only had to be taken once, or else a nanosystem so gentle and progressive that it only took its full effect after several administrations. There was a consistent gender difference, with male participants taking a more positive view of the risks, benefits and achievements involved in the various treatments than the female participants.",
keywords = "Medicine, Nanotechnology, Public understanding of science, Risk, Vignette study",
author = "Brigitte Nerlich and Clarke, {David D.} and Fiona Ulph",
year = "2007",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1080/13698570701306856",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "159--171",
journal = "Health, Risk and Society",
issn = "1369-8575",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risks and benefits of nanotechnology: How young adults perceive possible advances in nanomedicine compared with conventional treatments

AU - Nerlich, Brigitte

AU - Clarke, David D.

AU - Ulph, Fiona

PY - 2007/6

Y1 - 2007/6

N2 - Attitudes to nanotechnology are widely studied and are changing fast. An experiment comparing young peoples' attitudes to nanomedicine and conventional treatment was conducted on 434 undergraduate students. They answered a number of questions about a hypothetical arthritis sufferer who was to be treated with a drug or a newly invented nanomedical technique, and requiring either one treatment or several. They were more influenced by the difference between one-shot and repeated treatments than by any difference between drug- and nanodelivery. Furthermore the two treatments that seemed most negative to participants were a drug that had to be administered repeatedly, or a nanosystem that was needed only once. Participants preferred the thought of a drug that only had to be taken once, or else a nanosystem so gentle and progressive that it only took its full effect after several administrations. There was a consistent gender difference, with male participants taking a more positive view of the risks, benefits and achievements involved in the various treatments than the female participants.

AB - Attitudes to nanotechnology are widely studied and are changing fast. An experiment comparing young peoples' attitudes to nanomedicine and conventional treatment was conducted on 434 undergraduate students. They answered a number of questions about a hypothetical arthritis sufferer who was to be treated with a drug or a newly invented nanomedical technique, and requiring either one treatment or several. They were more influenced by the difference between one-shot and repeated treatments than by any difference between drug- and nanodelivery. Furthermore the two treatments that seemed most negative to participants were a drug that had to be administered repeatedly, or a nanosystem that was needed only once. Participants preferred the thought of a drug that only had to be taken once, or else a nanosystem so gentle and progressive that it only took its full effect after several administrations. There was a consistent gender difference, with male participants taking a more positive view of the risks, benefits and achievements involved in the various treatments than the female participants.

KW - Medicine

KW - Nanotechnology

KW - Public understanding of science

KW - Risk

KW - Vignette study

U2 - 10.1080/13698570701306856

DO - 10.1080/13698570701306856

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 159

EP - 171

JO - Health, Risk and Society

JF - Health, Risk and Society

SN - 1369-8575

IS - 2

ER -