Public perceptions of non-adherence to COVID-19 measures by self and others in the United KingdomCitation formats

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Public perceptions of non-adherence to COVID-19 measures by self and others in the United Kingdom. / Williams, Simon N.; Armitage, C J; Tampe, Tova; Dienes, Kimberly.

In: Health Expectations, 25.11.2020.

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@article{6e30aeafc0584ba7977475e7de9a6d70,
title = "Public perceptions of non-adherence to COVID-19 measures by self and others in the United Kingdom",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To explore the perceptions of non-adherence to COVID-19 policy measures by self and others in the UK, focusing on perceived reasons for non-adherence.DESIGN: Qualitative study comprising 12 online focus groups conducted between 25th September and 13th November 2020.SETTING: Online video-conferencingPARTICIPANTS: 51 UK residents aged 18 and above, reflecting a range of ages, genders and race/ethnicities.RESULTS: Participants reported seeing an increase in non-adherence in others and identified a number of challenges to their own adherence to measures. Thematic analysis identified six main themes related to participants{\textquoteright} reported reasons for non-adherence in self and others: (1) Alert fatigue (2) Inconsistent rules (3) Lack of trust in government (4) Helplessness (5) Resistance and rebelliousness (6) Reduced perception of risk and the prospect of a vaccine. Participants also raised concerns that adherence would be impacted by a desire to socialise over Christmas. Two forms of non-adherence were observed: overt rule-breaking and subjective rule interpretation.CONCLUSIONS: Adherence may be improved by: less frequent and clearer information on COVID-19 to reduce alert fatigue; implementing a more unified set of measures within and across countries in the UK; role modelling good adherence by authority figures; exploring ways to mitigate the impact that events like Christmas vaccine {\textquoteleft}breakthroughs{\textquoteright} may have on reducing adherence.",
author = "Williams, {Simon N.} and Armitage, {C J} and Tova Tampe and Kimberly Dienes",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "25",
language = "English",
journal = "Health expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy",
issn = "1369-7625",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Public perceptions of non-adherence to COVID-19 measures by self and others in the United Kingdom

AU - Williams, Simon N.

AU - Armitage, C J

AU - Tampe, Tova

AU - Dienes, Kimberly

PY - 2020/11/25

Y1 - 2020/11/25

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To explore the perceptions of non-adherence to COVID-19 policy measures by self and others in the UK, focusing on perceived reasons for non-adherence.DESIGN: Qualitative study comprising 12 online focus groups conducted between 25th September and 13th November 2020.SETTING: Online video-conferencingPARTICIPANTS: 51 UK residents aged 18 and above, reflecting a range of ages, genders and race/ethnicities.RESULTS: Participants reported seeing an increase in non-adherence in others and identified a number of challenges to their own adherence to measures. Thematic analysis identified six main themes related to participants’ reported reasons for non-adherence in self and others: (1) Alert fatigue (2) Inconsistent rules (3) Lack of trust in government (4) Helplessness (5) Resistance and rebelliousness (6) Reduced perception of risk and the prospect of a vaccine. Participants also raised concerns that adherence would be impacted by a desire to socialise over Christmas. Two forms of non-adherence were observed: overt rule-breaking and subjective rule interpretation.CONCLUSIONS: Adherence may be improved by: less frequent and clearer information on COVID-19 to reduce alert fatigue; implementing a more unified set of measures within and across countries in the UK; role modelling good adherence by authority figures; exploring ways to mitigate the impact that events like Christmas vaccine ‘breakthroughs’ may have on reducing adherence.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To explore the perceptions of non-adherence to COVID-19 policy measures by self and others in the UK, focusing on perceived reasons for non-adherence.DESIGN: Qualitative study comprising 12 online focus groups conducted between 25th September and 13th November 2020.SETTING: Online video-conferencingPARTICIPANTS: 51 UK residents aged 18 and above, reflecting a range of ages, genders and race/ethnicities.RESULTS: Participants reported seeing an increase in non-adherence in others and identified a number of challenges to their own adherence to measures. Thematic analysis identified six main themes related to participants’ reported reasons for non-adherence in self and others: (1) Alert fatigue (2) Inconsistent rules (3) Lack of trust in government (4) Helplessness (5) Resistance and rebelliousness (6) Reduced perception of risk and the prospect of a vaccine. Participants also raised concerns that adherence would be impacted by a desire to socialise over Christmas. Two forms of non-adherence were observed: overt rule-breaking and subjective rule interpretation.CONCLUSIONS: Adherence may be improved by: less frequent and clearer information on COVID-19 to reduce alert fatigue; implementing a more unified set of measures within and across countries in the UK; role modelling good adherence by authority figures; exploring ways to mitigate the impact that events like Christmas vaccine ‘breakthroughs’ may have on reducing adherence.

M3 - Article

JO - Health expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy

JF - Health expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy

SN - 1369-7625

ER -