Prediction errors in self- and externally-generated deviantsCitation formats

  • Authors:
  • Franziska Knolle
  • Erich Schröger
  • Sonja A. Kotz

Standard

Prediction errors in self- and externally-generated deviants. / Knolle, Franziska; Schröger, Erich; Kotz, Sonja A.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 92, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 410-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Knolle, F, Schröger, E & Kotz, SA 2013, 'Prediction errors in self- and externally-generated deviants', Biological Psychology, vol. 92, no. 2, pp. 410-416. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.11.017

APA

Knolle, F., Schröger, E., & Kotz, S. A. (2013). Prediction errors in self- and externally-generated deviants. Biological Psychology, 92(2), 410-416. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.11.017

Vancouver

Knolle F, Schröger E, Kotz SA. Prediction errors in self- and externally-generated deviants. Biological Psychology. 2013 Feb;92(2):410-416. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.11.017

Author

Knolle, Franziska ; Schröger, Erich ; Kotz, Sonja A. / Prediction errors in self- and externally-generated deviants. In: Biological Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 92, No. 2. pp. 410-416.

Bibtex

@article{ae4fda7403ad4faa97dd10edfec01075,
title = "Prediction errors in self- and externally-generated deviants",
abstract = "Sounds generated by one's own action elicit attenuated brain responses compared to brain responses to identical sounds that are externally-generated. The present study tested whether the suppression effect indexed by the N1- and P2-components of the event-related potential (ERP) is larger when self-generated sounds are correctly predicted than when they are not. Furthermore, sounds violating a prediction lead to a particular prediction error signal (i.e., N2b, P3a). Thus, we tested whether these error signals increase for self-generated sounds (i.e., enhanced N2b, P3a). We compared ERPs elicited by self- and externally-generated sounds that were of frequent standard and of infrequent deviant pitch. The results confirmed an N1- and P2-suppression effect elicited by self-generated standard sounds. The N1-suppression was smaller in response to self-initiated deviant sounds, indicating the specificity of predictions for self-generated sounds. In addition, an enhancement of N2b and P3a for self-generated deviants revealed the saliency of prediction error signals. {\textcopyright} 2012 Elsevier B.V.",
keywords = "Forward model, Prediction, Prediction error, Self-generated and externally-generated sounds",
author = "Franziska Knolle and Erich Schr{\"o}ger and Kotz, {Sonja A.}",
year = "2013",
month = feb
doi = "10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.11.017",
language = "English",
volume = "92",
pages = "410--416",
journal = "Biological Psychology",
issn = "0301-0511",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prediction errors in self- and externally-generated deviants

AU - Knolle, Franziska

AU - Schröger, Erich

AU - Kotz, Sonja A.

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - Sounds generated by one's own action elicit attenuated brain responses compared to brain responses to identical sounds that are externally-generated. The present study tested whether the suppression effect indexed by the N1- and P2-components of the event-related potential (ERP) is larger when self-generated sounds are correctly predicted than when they are not. Furthermore, sounds violating a prediction lead to a particular prediction error signal (i.e., N2b, P3a). Thus, we tested whether these error signals increase for self-generated sounds (i.e., enhanced N2b, P3a). We compared ERPs elicited by self- and externally-generated sounds that were of frequent standard and of infrequent deviant pitch. The results confirmed an N1- and P2-suppression effect elicited by self-generated standard sounds. The N1-suppression was smaller in response to self-initiated deviant sounds, indicating the specificity of predictions for self-generated sounds. In addition, an enhancement of N2b and P3a for self-generated deviants revealed the saliency of prediction error signals. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

AB - Sounds generated by one's own action elicit attenuated brain responses compared to brain responses to identical sounds that are externally-generated. The present study tested whether the suppression effect indexed by the N1- and P2-components of the event-related potential (ERP) is larger when self-generated sounds are correctly predicted than when they are not. Furthermore, sounds violating a prediction lead to a particular prediction error signal (i.e., N2b, P3a). Thus, we tested whether these error signals increase for self-generated sounds (i.e., enhanced N2b, P3a). We compared ERPs elicited by self- and externally-generated sounds that were of frequent standard and of infrequent deviant pitch. The results confirmed an N1- and P2-suppression effect elicited by self-generated standard sounds. The N1-suppression was smaller in response to self-initiated deviant sounds, indicating the specificity of predictions for self-generated sounds. In addition, an enhancement of N2b and P3a for self-generated deviants revealed the saliency of prediction error signals. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

KW - Forward model

KW - Prediction

KW - Prediction error

KW - Self-generated and externally-generated sounds

U2 - 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.11.017

DO - 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.11.017

M3 - Article

C2 - 23246535

VL - 92

SP - 410

EP - 416

JO - Biological Psychology

JF - Biological Psychology

SN - 0301-0511

IS - 2

ER -