Periodic actin structures in neuronal axons are required to maintain microtubulesCitation formats

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Periodic actin structures in neuronal axons are required to maintain microtubules. / Qu, Yue; Hahn, Ines; Webb, Stephen; Pearce, Simon; Prokop, Andreas.

In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, Vol. 28, No. 296-308, mbc.E16-10-0727, 15.01.2017, p. 296-308.

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Qu, Y, Hahn, I, Webb, S, Pearce, S & Prokop, A 2017, 'Periodic actin structures in neuronal axons are required to maintain microtubules', Molecular Biology of the Cell, vol. 28, no. 296-308, mbc.E16-10-0727, pp. 296-308. https://doi.org/10.1091/mbc.E16-10-0727

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Qu, Yue ; Hahn, Ines ; Webb, Stephen ; Pearce, Simon ; Prokop, Andreas. / Periodic actin structures in neuronal axons are required to maintain microtubules. In: Molecular Biology of the Cell. 2017 ; Vol. 28, No. 296-308. pp. 296-308.

Bibtex

@article{6c9a31e9849c46e590d60950715e274a,
title = "Periodic actin structures in neuronal axons are required to maintain microtubules",
abstract = "Axons are the cable-like neuronal processes wiring the nervous system. They contain parallel bundles of microtubules as structural backbones, surrounded by regularly-spaced actin rings termed the periodic membrane skeleton (PMS). Despite being an evolutionarily-conserved, ubiquitous, highly-ordered feature of axons, the function of PMS is unknown. Here we studied PMS abundance, organisation and function, combining versatile Drosophila genetics with super-resolution microscopy and various functional readouts. Analyses with 11 different actin regulators and 3 actin-targeting drugs suggest PMS to contain short actin filaments which are depolymerisation resistant and sensitive to spectrin, adducin and nucleator deficiency - consistent with microscopy-derived models proposing PMS as specialised cortical actin. Upon actin removal we observed gaps in microtubule bundles, reduced microtubule polymerisation and reduced axon numbers suggesting a role of PMS in microtubule organisation. These effects become strongly enhanced when carried out in neurons lacking the microtubule-stabilising protein Short stop (Shot). Combining the aforementioned actin manipulations with Shot deficiency revealed a close correlation between PMS abundance and microtubule regulation, consistent with a model in which PMS-dependent microtubule polymerisation contributes to their maintenance in axons. We discuss potential implications of this novel PMS function along axon shafts for axon maintenance and regeneration.",
keywords = "actin, axons, microtubules, Drosophila, development, ageing, cytoskeleton",
author = "Yue Qu and Ines Hahn and Stephen Webb and Simon Pearce and Andreas Prokop",
year = "2017",
month = jan,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1091/mbc.E16-10-0727",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "296--308",
journal = "Molecular Biology of the Cell (Online)",
issn = "1059-1524",
publisher = "American Society for Cell Biology",
number = "296-308",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Periodic actin structures in neuronal axons are required to maintain microtubules

AU - Qu, Yue

AU - Hahn, Ines

AU - Webb, Stephen

AU - Pearce, Simon

AU - Prokop, Andreas

PY - 2017/1/15

Y1 - 2017/1/15

N2 - Axons are the cable-like neuronal processes wiring the nervous system. They contain parallel bundles of microtubules as structural backbones, surrounded by regularly-spaced actin rings termed the periodic membrane skeleton (PMS). Despite being an evolutionarily-conserved, ubiquitous, highly-ordered feature of axons, the function of PMS is unknown. Here we studied PMS abundance, organisation and function, combining versatile Drosophila genetics with super-resolution microscopy and various functional readouts. Analyses with 11 different actin regulators and 3 actin-targeting drugs suggest PMS to contain short actin filaments which are depolymerisation resistant and sensitive to spectrin, adducin and nucleator deficiency - consistent with microscopy-derived models proposing PMS as specialised cortical actin. Upon actin removal we observed gaps in microtubule bundles, reduced microtubule polymerisation and reduced axon numbers suggesting a role of PMS in microtubule organisation. These effects become strongly enhanced when carried out in neurons lacking the microtubule-stabilising protein Short stop (Shot). Combining the aforementioned actin manipulations with Shot deficiency revealed a close correlation between PMS abundance and microtubule regulation, consistent with a model in which PMS-dependent microtubule polymerisation contributes to their maintenance in axons. We discuss potential implications of this novel PMS function along axon shafts for axon maintenance and regeneration.

AB - Axons are the cable-like neuronal processes wiring the nervous system. They contain parallel bundles of microtubules as structural backbones, surrounded by regularly-spaced actin rings termed the periodic membrane skeleton (PMS). Despite being an evolutionarily-conserved, ubiquitous, highly-ordered feature of axons, the function of PMS is unknown. Here we studied PMS abundance, organisation and function, combining versatile Drosophila genetics with super-resolution microscopy and various functional readouts. Analyses with 11 different actin regulators and 3 actin-targeting drugs suggest PMS to contain short actin filaments which are depolymerisation resistant and sensitive to spectrin, adducin and nucleator deficiency - consistent with microscopy-derived models proposing PMS as specialised cortical actin. Upon actin removal we observed gaps in microtubule bundles, reduced microtubule polymerisation and reduced axon numbers suggesting a role of PMS in microtubule organisation. These effects become strongly enhanced when carried out in neurons lacking the microtubule-stabilising protein Short stop (Shot). Combining the aforementioned actin manipulations with Shot deficiency revealed a close correlation between PMS abundance and microtubule regulation, consistent with a model in which PMS-dependent microtubule polymerisation contributes to their maintenance in axons. We discuss potential implications of this novel PMS function along axon shafts for axon maintenance and regeneration.

KW - actin

KW - axons

KW - microtubules

KW - Drosophila

KW - development

KW - ageing

KW - cytoskeleton

U2 - 10.1091/mbc.E16-10-0727

DO - 10.1091/mbc.E16-10-0727

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 296

EP - 308

JO - Molecular Biology of the Cell (Online)

JF - Molecular Biology of the Cell (Online)

SN - 1059-1524

IS - 296-308

M1 - mbc.E16-10-0727

ER -