Novel approaches in the inhibition of IgE-induced mast cell reactivity in food allergyCitation formats

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Novel approaches in the inhibition of IgE-induced mast cell reactivity in food allergy. / Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Tontini, Chiara.

In: Frontiers in Immunology, 2021.

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@article{b2eab72818b14ee5a6660499a815e05d,
title = "Novel approaches in the inhibition of IgE-induced mast cell reactivity in food allergy",
abstract = "Allergy is an IgE-dependent type-I hypersensitivity reaction that can lead to life-threatening systemic symptoms such asanaphylaxis. In the pathogenesis of the allergic response, the common upstream event is the binding of allergens to specific IgE,inducing cross‐linking of the high‐affinity FcRI on mast cells, triggering cellular degranulation and the release of histamine,proteases, lipids mediators, cytokines and chemokines with inflammatory activity. A number of novel therapeutic options to curbmast cell activation are in the pipeline for the treatment of severe allergies. In addition to anti-IgE therapy and allergen-specificimmunotherapy, monoclonal antibodies targeted against several key Th2/alarmin cytokines (i.e. IL‐4Rα, IL‐33, TSLP), activemodification of allergen-specific IgE (i.e. inhibitory compounds, monoclonal antibodies, de-sialylation), engagement of inhibitoryreceptors on mast cells and allergen-specific adjuvant vaccines, are new promising options to inhibit the uncontrolled release ofmast cell mediators upon allergen exposure. In this review, we critically discuss the novel approaches targeting mast cells limitingallergic responses and the immunological mechanisms involved, with special interest on food allergy treatment.",
author = "Silvia Bulfone-Paus and Chiara Tontini",
year = "2021",
language = "English",
journal = "Frontiers in Immunology",
issn = "1664-3224",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S. A.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Novel approaches in the inhibition of IgE-induced mast cell reactivity in food allergy

AU - Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

AU - Tontini, Chiara

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - Allergy is an IgE-dependent type-I hypersensitivity reaction that can lead to life-threatening systemic symptoms such asanaphylaxis. In the pathogenesis of the allergic response, the common upstream event is the binding of allergens to specific IgE,inducing cross‐linking of the high‐affinity FcRI on mast cells, triggering cellular degranulation and the release of histamine,proteases, lipids mediators, cytokines and chemokines with inflammatory activity. A number of novel therapeutic options to curbmast cell activation are in the pipeline for the treatment of severe allergies. In addition to anti-IgE therapy and allergen-specificimmunotherapy, monoclonal antibodies targeted against several key Th2/alarmin cytokines (i.e. IL‐4Rα, IL‐33, TSLP), activemodification of allergen-specific IgE (i.e. inhibitory compounds, monoclonal antibodies, de-sialylation), engagement of inhibitoryreceptors on mast cells and allergen-specific adjuvant vaccines, are new promising options to inhibit the uncontrolled release ofmast cell mediators upon allergen exposure. In this review, we critically discuss the novel approaches targeting mast cells limitingallergic responses and the immunological mechanisms involved, with special interest on food allergy treatment.

AB - Allergy is an IgE-dependent type-I hypersensitivity reaction that can lead to life-threatening systemic symptoms such asanaphylaxis. In the pathogenesis of the allergic response, the common upstream event is the binding of allergens to specific IgE,inducing cross‐linking of the high‐affinity FcRI on mast cells, triggering cellular degranulation and the release of histamine,proteases, lipids mediators, cytokines and chemokines with inflammatory activity. A number of novel therapeutic options to curbmast cell activation are in the pipeline for the treatment of severe allergies. In addition to anti-IgE therapy and allergen-specificimmunotherapy, monoclonal antibodies targeted against several key Th2/alarmin cytokines (i.e. IL‐4Rα, IL‐33, TSLP), activemodification of allergen-specific IgE (i.e. inhibitory compounds, monoclonal antibodies, de-sialylation), engagement of inhibitoryreceptors on mast cells and allergen-specific adjuvant vaccines, are new promising options to inhibit the uncontrolled release ofmast cell mediators upon allergen exposure. In this review, we critically discuss the novel approaches targeting mast cells limitingallergic responses and the immunological mechanisms involved, with special interest on food allergy treatment.

M3 - Article

JO - Frontiers in Immunology

JF - Frontiers in Immunology

SN - 1664-3224

ER -