Motivating factors behind skill mix changeCitation formats

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Motivating factors behind skill mix change : results from a practice managers' survey in England. / Gibson, Jon; Spooner, Sharon; Sutton, Matt; McDermott, Imelda; Goff, Mhorag; Checkland, Kath; Hodgson, Damian; McBride, Anne; Hann, Mark.

In: The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, Vol. 70, 18.06.2020.

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Gibson J, Spooner S, Sutton M, McDermott I, Goff M, Checkland K et al. Motivating factors behind skill mix change: results from a practice managers' survey in England. The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners. 2020 Jun 18;70. https://doi.org/10.3399/bjgp20X711401

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@article{493a799791874d8cae7d7377ab6dec77,
title = "Motivating factors behind skill mix change: results from a practice managers' survey in England",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The expansion of the primary care workforce by employing a varied range of practitioners ('skill mix') is a key component of the General Practice Forward View (GPFV). The extent of skill mix change and where that has occurred has been examined using publicly available practice level workforce data. However, such data does not provide information regarding specific motivating factors behind employment decisions for individual practices nor future workforce plans. AIM: To identify key motivating factors behind practice workforce decisions and their future workforce plans. METHOD: An online questionnaire was sent to practice managers in England. Data collection is ongoing; however, 1000 practices have responded to the survey so far. The questionnaire was composed of questions related to current workforce, motivating factors behind employment decisions, planned future workforce changes, financial assistance with employing staff (for example, HEE or CCG funding) and ideal workforce. RESULTS: Early results indicate that practices that have employed physician associates have done so to increase appointment availability (78% of practices) and release GP time (68%). Sixty-six per cent of practices who have employed pharmacists have received some form of financial assistance with 21% of practices still receiving assistance. When asked to construct an ideal workforce, 'new' roles accounted for 20% of that workforce on average, which is a significantly larger proportion than those roles currently account for. CONCLUSION: Although data collection and analysis are ongoing, the results of the survey provide novel insights into the underlying motivating factors behind employment decisions, specifically for new roles such as pharmacists, PAs and paramedics.",
author = "Jon Gibson and Sharon Spooner and Matt Sutton and Imelda McDermott and Mhorag Goff and Kath Checkland and Damian Hodgson and Anne McBride and Mark Hann",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} British Journal of General Practice 2020. Copyright: This record is sourced from MEDLINE/PubMed, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine",
year = "2020",
month = jun,
day = "18",
doi = "10.3399/bjgp20X711401",
language = "English",
volume = "70",
journal = "British Journal of General Practice",
issn = "0960-1643",
publisher = "Royal College of General Practitioners",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motivating factors behind skill mix change

T2 - results from a practice managers' survey in England

AU - Gibson, Jon

AU - Spooner, Sharon

AU - Sutton, Matt

AU - McDermott, Imelda

AU - Goff, Mhorag

AU - Checkland, Kath

AU - Hodgson, Damian

AU - McBride, Anne

AU - Hann, Mark

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © British Journal of General Practice 2020. Copyright: This record is sourced from MEDLINE/PubMed, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

PY - 2020/6/18

Y1 - 2020/6/18

N2 - BACKGROUND: The expansion of the primary care workforce by employing a varied range of practitioners ('skill mix') is a key component of the General Practice Forward View (GPFV). The extent of skill mix change and where that has occurred has been examined using publicly available practice level workforce data. However, such data does not provide information regarding specific motivating factors behind employment decisions for individual practices nor future workforce plans. AIM: To identify key motivating factors behind practice workforce decisions and their future workforce plans. METHOD: An online questionnaire was sent to practice managers in England. Data collection is ongoing; however, 1000 practices have responded to the survey so far. The questionnaire was composed of questions related to current workforce, motivating factors behind employment decisions, planned future workforce changes, financial assistance with employing staff (for example, HEE or CCG funding) and ideal workforce. RESULTS: Early results indicate that practices that have employed physician associates have done so to increase appointment availability (78% of practices) and release GP time (68%). Sixty-six per cent of practices who have employed pharmacists have received some form of financial assistance with 21% of practices still receiving assistance. When asked to construct an ideal workforce, 'new' roles accounted for 20% of that workforce on average, which is a significantly larger proportion than those roles currently account for. CONCLUSION: Although data collection and analysis are ongoing, the results of the survey provide novel insights into the underlying motivating factors behind employment decisions, specifically for new roles such as pharmacists, PAs and paramedics.

AB - BACKGROUND: The expansion of the primary care workforce by employing a varied range of practitioners ('skill mix') is a key component of the General Practice Forward View (GPFV). The extent of skill mix change and where that has occurred has been examined using publicly available practice level workforce data. However, such data does not provide information regarding specific motivating factors behind employment decisions for individual practices nor future workforce plans. AIM: To identify key motivating factors behind practice workforce decisions and their future workforce plans. METHOD: An online questionnaire was sent to practice managers in England. Data collection is ongoing; however, 1000 practices have responded to the survey so far. The questionnaire was composed of questions related to current workforce, motivating factors behind employment decisions, planned future workforce changes, financial assistance with employing staff (for example, HEE or CCG funding) and ideal workforce. RESULTS: Early results indicate that practices that have employed physician associates have done so to increase appointment availability (78% of practices) and release GP time (68%). Sixty-six per cent of practices who have employed pharmacists have received some form of financial assistance with 21% of practices still receiving assistance. When asked to construct an ideal workforce, 'new' roles accounted for 20% of that workforce on average, which is a significantly larger proportion than those roles currently account for. CONCLUSION: Although data collection and analysis are ongoing, the results of the survey provide novel insights into the underlying motivating factors behind employment decisions, specifically for new roles such as pharmacists, PAs and paramedics.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85086716940&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3399/bjgp20X711401

DO - 10.3399/bjgp20X711401

M3 - Article

C2 - 32554665

AN - SCOPUS:85086716940

VL - 70

JO - British Journal of General Practice

JF - British Journal of General Practice

SN - 0960-1643

ER -