Melanopsin cells are the principal conduits for rod-cone input to non-image-forming visionCitation formats

  • External authors:
  • Ali D. Güler
  • Jennifer L. Ecker
  • Gurprit S. Lall
  • Shafiqul Haq
  • Cara M. Altimus
  • Hsi Wen Liao
  • Alun R. Barnard
  • Hugh Cahill
  • Tudor C. Badea
  • Haiqing Zhao
  • Mark W. Hankins
  • David M. Berson
  • King Wai Yau
  • Samer Hattar

Standard

Melanopsin cells are the principal conduits for rod-cone input to non-image-forming vision. / Güler, Ali D.; Ecker, Jennifer L.; Lall, Gurprit S.; Haq, Shafiqul; Altimus, Cara M.; Liao, Hsi Wen; Barnard, Alun R.; Cahill, Hugh; Badea, Tudor C.; Zhao, Haiqing; Hankins, Mark W.; Berson, David M.; Lucas, Robert J.; Yau, King Wai; Hattar, Samer.

In: Nature, Vol. 453, No. 7191, 01.05.2008, p. 102-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Güler, AD, Ecker, JL, Lall, GS, Haq, S, Altimus, CM, Liao, HW, Barnard, AR, Cahill, H, Badea, TC, Zhao, H, Hankins, MW, Berson, DM, Lucas, RJ, Yau, KW & Hattar, S 2008, 'Melanopsin cells are the principal conduits for rod-cone input to non-image-forming vision', Nature, vol. 453, no. 7191, pp. 102-105. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06829

APA

Güler, A. D., Ecker, J. L., Lall, G. S., Haq, S., Altimus, C. M., Liao, H. W., Barnard, A. R., Cahill, H., Badea, T. C., Zhao, H., Hankins, M. W., Berson, D. M., Lucas, R. J., Yau, K. W., & Hattar, S. (2008). Melanopsin cells are the principal conduits for rod-cone input to non-image-forming vision. Nature, 453(7191), 102-105. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06829

Vancouver

Güler AD, Ecker JL, Lall GS, Haq S, Altimus CM, Liao HW et al. Melanopsin cells are the principal conduits for rod-cone input to non-image-forming vision. Nature. 2008 May 1;453(7191):102-105. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06829

Author

Güler, Ali D. ; Ecker, Jennifer L. ; Lall, Gurprit S. ; Haq, Shafiqul ; Altimus, Cara M. ; Liao, Hsi Wen ; Barnard, Alun R. ; Cahill, Hugh ; Badea, Tudor C. ; Zhao, Haiqing ; Hankins, Mark W. ; Berson, David M. ; Lucas, Robert J. ; Yau, King Wai ; Hattar, Samer. / Melanopsin cells are the principal conduits for rod-cone input to non-image-forming vision. In: Nature. 2008 ; Vol. 453, No. 7191. pp. 102-105.

Bibtex

@article{9fd0354351954c7abf3979a65d8f7daa,
title = "Melanopsin cells are the principal conduits for rod-cone input to non-image-forming vision",
abstract = "Rod and cone photoreceptors detect light and relay this information through a multisynaptic pathway to the brain by means of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). These retinal outputs support not only pattern vision but also non-image-forming (NIF) functions, which include circadian photoentrainment and pupillary light reflex (PLR). In mammals, NIF functions are mediated by rods, cones and the melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Rod-cone photoreceptors and ipRGCs are complementary in signalling light intensity for NIF functions. The ipRGCs, in addition to being directly photosensitive, also receive synaptic input from rod-cone networks. To determine how the ipRGCs relay rod-cone light information for both image-forming and non-image-forming functions, we genetically ablated ipRGCs in mice. Here we show that animals lacking ipRGCs retain pattern vision but have deficits in both PLR and circadian photoentrainment that are more extensive than those observed in melanopsin knockouts. The defects in PLR and photoentrainment resemble those observed in animals that lack phototransduction in all three photoreceptor classes. These results indicate that light signals for irradiance detection are dissociated from pattern vision at the retinal ganglion cell level, and animals that cannot detect light for NIF functions are still capable of image formation. {\textcopyright}2008 Nature Publishing Group.",
author = "G{\"u}ler, {Ali D.} and Ecker, {Jennifer L.} and Lall, {Gurprit S.} and Shafiqul Haq and Altimus, {Cara M.} and Liao, {Hsi Wen} and Barnard, {Alun R.} and Hugh Cahill and Badea, {Tudor C.} and Haiqing Zhao and Hankins, {Mark W.} and Berson, {David M.} and Lucas, {Robert J.} and Yau, {King Wai} and Samer Hattar",
year = "2008",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nature06829",
language = "English",
volume = "453",
pages = "102--105",
journal = "Nature: international weekly journal of science",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "7191",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Melanopsin cells are the principal conduits for rod-cone input to non-image-forming vision

AU - Güler, Ali D.

AU - Ecker, Jennifer L.

AU - Lall, Gurprit S.

AU - Haq, Shafiqul

AU - Altimus, Cara M.

AU - Liao, Hsi Wen

AU - Barnard, Alun R.

AU - Cahill, Hugh

AU - Badea, Tudor C.

AU - Zhao, Haiqing

AU - Hankins, Mark W.

AU - Berson, David M.

AU - Lucas, Robert J.

AU - Yau, King Wai

AU - Hattar, Samer

PY - 2008/5/1

Y1 - 2008/5/1

N2 - Rod and cone photoreceptors detect light and relay this information through a multisynaptic pathway to the brain by means of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). These retinal outputs support not only pattern vision but also non-image-forming (NIF) functions, which include circadian photoentrainment and pupillary light reflex (PLR). In mammals, NIF functions are mediated by rods, cones and the melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Rod-cone photoreceptors and ipRGCs are complementary in signalling light intensity for NIF functions. The ipRGCs, in addition to being directly photosensitive, also receive synaptic input from rod-cone networks. To determine how the ipRGCs relay rod-cone light information for both image-forming and non-image-forming functions, we genetically ablated ipRGCs in mice. Here we show that animals lacking ipRGCs retain pattern vision but have deficits in both PLR and circadian photoentrainment that are more extensive than those observed in melanopsin knockouts. The defects in PLR and photoentrainment resemble those observed in animals that lack phototransduction in all three photoreceptor classes. These results indicate that light signals for irradiance detection are dissociated from pattern vision at the retinal ganglion cell level, and animals that cannot detect light for NIF functions are still capable of image formation. ©2008 Nature Publishing Group.

AB - Rod and cone photoreceptors detect light and relay this information through a multisynaptic pathway to the brain by means of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). These retinal outputs support not only pattern vision but also non-image-forming (NIF) functions, which include circadian photoentrainment and pupillary light reflex (PLR). In mammals, NIF functions are mediated by rods, cones and the melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Rod-cone photoreceptors and ipRGCs are complementary in signalling light intensity for NIF functions. The ipRGCs, in addition to being directly photosensitive, also receive synaptic input from rod-cone networks. To determine how the ipRGCs relay rod-cone light information for both image-forming and non-image-forming functions, we genetically ablated ipRGCs in mice. Here we show that animals lacking ipRGCs retain pattern vision but have deficits in both PLR and circadian photoentrainment that are more extensive than those observed in melanopsin knockouts. The defects in PLR and photoentrainment resemble those observed in animals that lack phototransduction in all three photoreceptor classes. These results indicate that light signals for irradiance detection are dissociated from pattern vision at the retinal ganglion cell level, and animals that cannot detect light for NIF functions are still capable of image formation. ©2008 Nature Publishing Group.

U2 - 10.1038/nature06829

DO - 10.1038/nature06829

M3 - Article

C2 - 18432195

VL - 453

SP - 102

EP - 105

JO - Nature: international weekly journal of science

JF - Nature: international weekly journal of science

SN - 0028-0836

IS - 7191

ER -