Materials' physics in extremes: AkrologyCitation formats

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Materials' physics in extremes: Akrology. / Bourne, N. K.

In: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science, Vol. 42, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 2975-2984.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Bourne, NK 2011, 'Materials' physics in extremes: Akrology', Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science, vol. 42, no. 10, pp. 2975-2984. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11661-011-0720-1

APA

Bourne, N. K. (2011). Materials' physics in extremes: Akrology. Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science, 42(10), 2975-2984. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11661-011-0720-1

Vancouver

Bourne NK. Materials' physics in extremes: Akrology. Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science. 2011 Oct;42(10):2975-2984. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11661-011-0720-1

Author

Bourne, N. K. / Materials' physics in extremes: Akrology. In: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science. 2011 ; Vol. 42, No. 10. pp. 2975-2984.

Bibtex

@article{4e7c31f323b741bf9d0da65c33437e64,
title = "Materials' physics in extremes: Akrology",
abstract = "An understanding of the behavior of materials in mechanical extremes has become a pressing need in order to exploit new environments. Any impulse consists of a cascade of deformation mechanisms starting with ultrafast and concluding with slower ones, yet these have not been suitably defined over the past years. This requirement has prompted the design of new experimental platforms and diagnostics and an increase in modern computer power. However, this effort has removed necessary focus on the operating suite of deformation mechanisms activated in loaded materials. This article reviews the material response and attempts to order physical pathways according to the length and time scales they operate within. A dimensionless constant is introduced to scale the contributions of component pathways by quantifying their completion with respect to the loading impulse applied. This concept is extended to suggest a new framework to describe the response to arbitrary insult and to show the relevance of particular techniques to component parts of the problem. The application of a step impulse via shock loading is shown to be the primary derivation experiment to address these needs and map components of the response. {\circledC} 2011 The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International.",
author = "Bourne, {N. K.}",
note = "Times Cited: 5",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1007/s11661-011-0720-1",
language = "English",
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journal = "Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A - Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science",
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RIS

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T1 - Materials' physics in extremes: Akrology

AU - Bourne, N. K.

N1 - Times Cited: 5

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - An understanding of the behavior of materials in mechanical extremes has become a pressing need in order to exploit new environments. Any impulse consists of a cascade of deformation mechanisms starting with ultrafast and concluding with slower ones, yet these have not been suitably defined over the past years. This requirement has prompted the design of new experimental platforms and diagnostics and an increase in modern computer power. However, this effort has removed necessary focus on the operating suite of deformation mechanisms activated in loaded materials. This article reviews the material response and attempts to order physical pathways according to the length and time scales they operate within. A dimensionless constant is introduced to scale the contributions of component pathways by quantifying their completion with respect to the loading impulse applied. This concept is extended to suggest a new framework to describe the response to arbitrary insult and to show the relevance of particular techniques to component parts of the problem. The application of a step impulse via shock loading is shown to be the primary derivation experiment to address these needs and map components of the response. © 2011 The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International.

AB - An understanding of the behavior of materials in mechanical extremes has become a pressing need in order to exploit new environments. Any impulse consists of a cascade of deformation mechanisms starting with ultrafast and concluding with slower ones, yet these have not been suitably defined over the past years. This requirement has prompted the design of new experimental platforms and diagnostics and an increase in modern computer power. However, this effort has removed necessary focus on the operating suite of deformation mechanisms activated in loaded materials. This article reviews the material response and attempts to order physical pathways according to the length and time scales they operate within. A dimensionless constant is introduced to scale the contributions of component pathways by quantifying their completion with respect to the loading impulse applied. This concept is extended to suggest a new framework to describe the response to arbitrary insult and to show the relevance of particular techniques to component parts of the problem. The application of a step impulse via shock loading is shown to be the primary derivation experiment to address these needs and map components of the response. © 2011 The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International.

U2 - 10.1007/s11661-011-0720-1

DO - 10.1007/s11661-011-0720-1

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 2975

EP - 2984

JO - Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A - Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science

JF - Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A - Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science

SN - 1073-5623

IS - 10

ER -