Making every drop countCitation formats

  • External authors:
  • Josephine McCullagh
  • Harriet Tucker
  • Jane Davies
  • Dave Edmondson
  • Julia Lancut
  • Angela Maddison
  • Anne Weaver
  • Ross Davenport
  • Laura Green

Standard

Making every drop count : Reducing wastage of a novel blood component for transfusion of trauma patients. / McCullagh, Josephine; Proudlove, Nathan; Tucker, Harriet; Davies, Jane; Edmondson, Dave; Lancut, Julia; Maddison, Angela; Weaver, Anne; Davenport, Ross; Green, Laura.

In: BMJ Open Quality, Vol. 10, No. 3, e001396, 08.07.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

McCullagh, J, Proudlove, N, Tucker, H, Davies, J, Edmondson, D, Lancut, J, Maddison, A, Weaver, A, Davenport, R & Green, L 2021, 'Making every drop count: Reducing wastage of a novel blood component for transfusion of trauma patients', BMJ Open Quality, vol. 10, no. 3, e001396. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjoq-2021-001396

APA

McCullagh, J., Proudlove, N., Tucker, H., Davies, J., Edmondson, D., Lancut, J., Maddison, A., Weaver, A., Davenport, R., & Green, L. (2021). Making every drop count: Reducing wastage of a novel blood component for transfusion of trauma patients. BMJ Open Quality, 10(3), [e001396]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjoq-2021-001396

Vancouver

McCullagh J, Proudlove N, Tucker H, Davies J, Edmondson D, Lancut J et al. Making every drop count: Reducing wastage of a novel blood component for transfusion of trauma patients. BMJ Open Quality. 2021 Jul 8;10(3). e001396. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjoq-2021-001396

Author

McCullagh, Josephine ; Proudlove, Nathan ; Tucker, Harriet ; Davies, Jane ; Edmondson, Dave ; Lancut, Julia ; Maddison, Angela ; Weaver, Anne ; Davenport, Ross ; Green, Laura. / Making every drop count : Reducing wastage of a novel blood component for transfusion of trauma patients. In: BMJ Open Quality. 2021 ; Vol. 10, No. 3.

Bibtex

@article{2ccf28e659194a53a6732c6f616d58fa,
title = "Making every drop count: Reducing wastage of a novel blood component for transfusion of trauma patients",
abstract = "Recent research demonstrates that transfusing whole blood (WB=red blood cells (RBC)+plasma+platelets) rather than just RBC (which is current National Health Service (NHS) practice) may improve outcomes for major trauma patients. As part of a programme to investigate provision of WB, NHS Blood and Transplant undertook a 2-year feasibility study to supply the Royal London Hospital (RLH) with (group O negative, {\textquoteleft}O neg{\textquoteright}) leucodepleted red cell and plasma (LD-RCP) for transfusion of trauma patients with major haemorrhage in prehospital settings.Incidents requiring such prehospital transfusion occur randomly, with very high variation. Availability is critical, but O neg LD-RCP is a scarce resource and has a limited shelf life (14 days) after which it must be disposed of. The consequences of wastage are the opportunity cost of loss of overall treatment capacity across the NHS and reputational damage.The context was this feasibility study, set up to assess deliverability to RLH and subsequent wastage levels. Within this, we conducted a quality improvement project, which aimed to reduce the wastage of LD-RCP to no more than 8% (ie, 1 of the 12 units delivered per week).Over this 2-year period, we reduced wastage from a weekly average of 70%–27%. This was achieved over four improvement cycles. The largest improvement came from moving near-expiry LD-RCP to the emergency department (ED) for use with their trauma patients, with subsequent improvements from embedding use in ED as routine practice, introducing a dedicated LD-RCP delivery schedule (which increased the units ≤2 days old at delivery from 42% to 83%) and aligning this delivery schedule to cover two cycles of peak demand (Fridays and Saturdays).",
keywords = "advanced trauma life support care, control charts/run charts, emergency department, prehospital care, quality improvement",
author = "Josephine McCullagh and Nathan Proudlove and Harriet Tucker and Jane Davies and Dave Edmondson and Julia Lancut and Angela Maddison and Anne Weaver and Ross Davenport and Laura Green",
note = "{\textcopyright} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1136/bmjoq-2021-001396",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "BMJ Open Quality",
issn = "2399-6641",
publisher = "BMJ ",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Making every drop count

T2 - Reducing wastage of a novel blood component for transfusion of trauma patients

AU - McCullagh, Josephine

AU - Proudlove, Nathan

AU - Tucker, Harriet

AU - Davies, Jane

AU - Edmondson, Dave

AU - Lancut, Julia

AU - Maddison, Angela

AU - Weaver, Anne

AU - Davenport, Ross

AU - Green, Laura

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2021/7/8

Y1 - 2021/7/8

N2 - Recent research demonstrates that transfusing whole blood (WB=red blood cells (RBC)+plasma+platelets) rather than just RBC (which is current National Health Service (NHS) practice) may improve outcomes for major trauma patients. As part of a programme to investigate provision of WB, NHS Blood and Transplant undertook a 2-year feasibility study to supply the Royal London Hospital (RLH) with (group O negative, ‘O neg’) leucodepleted red cell and plasma (LD-RCP) for transfusion of trauma patients with major haemorrhage in prehospital settings.Incidents requiring such prehospital transfusion occur randomly, with very high variation. Availability is critical, but O neg LD-RCP is a scarce resource and has a limited shelf life (14 days) after which it must be disposed of. The consequences of wastage are the opportunity cost of loss of overall treatment capacity across the NHS and reputational damage.The context was this feasibility study, set up to assess deliverability to RLH and subsequent wastage levels. Within this, we conducted a quality improvement project, which aimed to reduce the wastage of LD-RCP to no more than 8% (ie, 1 of the 12 units delivered per week).Over this 2-year period, we reduced wastage from a weekly average of 70%–27%. This was achieved over four improvement cycles. The largest improvement came from moving near-expiry LD-RCP to the emergency department (ED) for use with their trauma patients, with subsequent improvements from embedding use in ED as routine practice, introducing a dedicated LD-RCP delivery schedule (which increased the units ≤2 days old at delivery from 42% to 83%) and aligning this delivery schedule to cover two cycles of peak demand (Fridays and Saturdays).

AB - Recent research demonstrates that transfusing whole blood (WB=red blood cells (RBC)+plasma+platelets) rather than just RBC (which is current National Health Service (NHS) practice) may improve outcomes for major trauma patients. As part of a programme to investigate provision of WB, NHS Blood and Transplant undertook a 2-year feasibility study to supply the Royal London Hospital (RLH) with (group O negative, ‘O neg’) leucodepleted red cell and plasma (LD-RCP) for transfusion of trauma patients with major haemorrhage in prehospital settings.Incidents requiring such prehospital transfusion occur randomly, with very high variation. Availability is critical, but O neg LD-RCP is a scarce resource and has a limited shelf life (14 days) after which it must be disposed of. The consequences of wastage are the opportunity cost of loss of overall treatment capacity across the NHS and reputational damage.The context was this feasibility study, set up to assess deliverability to RLH and subsequent wastage levels. Within this, we conducted a quality improvement project, which aimed to reduce the wastage of LD-RCP to no more than 8% (ie, 1 of the 12 units delivered per week).Over this 2-year period, we reduced wastage from a weekly average of 70%–27%. This was achieved over four improvement cycles. The largest improvement came from moving near-expiry LD-RCP to the emergency department (ED) for use with their trauma patients, with subsequent improvements from embedding use in ED as routine practice, introducing a dedicated LD-RCP delivery schedule (which increased the units ≤2 days old at delivery from 42% to 83%) and aligning this delivery schedule to cover two cycles of peak demand (Fridays and Saturdays).

KW - advanced trauma life support care

KW - control charts/run charts

KW - emergency department

KW - prehospital care

KW - quality improvement

U2 - 10.1136/bmjoq-2021-001396

DO - 10.1136/bmjoq-2021-001396

M3 - Article

C2 - 34244177

VL - 10

JO - BMJ Open Quality

JF - BMJ Open Quality

SN - 2399-6641

IS - 3

M1 - e001396

ER -