Long-term exposure to PM10 and NO2 in association with lung volume and airway resistance in the MAAS birth cohort.Citation formats

  • External authors:
  • Raymond M Agius
  • Frank de Vocht
  • William Gerrard
  • Lesley Lowe
  • Danielle Belgrave
  • Adnan Custovic

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Long-term exposure to PM10 and NO2 in association with lung volume and airway resistance in the MAAS birth cohort. / Mölter, Anna; Agius, Raymond M; de Vocht, Frank; Lindley, Sarah; Gerrard, William; Lowe, Lesley; Belgrave, Danielle; Custovic, Adnan; Simpson, Angela.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 121, No. 10, 10.2013, p. 1232-1238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Mölter, A, Agius, RM, de Vocht, F, Lindley, S, Gerrard, W, Lowe, L, Belgrave, D, Custovic, A & Simpson, A 2013, 'Long-term exposure to PM10 and NO2 in association with lung volume and airway resistance in the MAAS birth cohort.', Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 121, no. 10, pp. 1232-1238. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205961

APA

Vancouver

Mölter A, Agius RM, de Vocht F, Lindley S, Gerrard W, Lowe L et al. Long-term exposure to PM10 and NO2 in association with lung volume and airway resistance in the MAAS birth cohort. Environmental Health Perspectives. 2013 Oct;121(10):1232-1238. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205961

Author

Mölter, Anna ; Agius, Raymond M ; de Vocht, Frank ; Lindley, Sarah ; Gerrard, William ; Lowe, Lesley ; Belgrave, Danielle ; Custovic, Adnan ; Simpson, Angela. / Long-term exposure to PM10 and NO2 in association with lung volume and airway resistance in the MAAS birth cohort. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2013 ; Vol. 121, No. 10. pp. 1232-1238.

Bibtex

@article{23424e035dc343acb493a1b82100914b,
title = "Long-term exposure to PM10 and NO2 in association with lung volume and airway resistance in the MAAS birth cohort.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Findings from previous studies on the effects of air pollution exposure on lung function during childhood have been inconsistent. A common limitation has been the quality of exposure data used, and few studies have modeled exposure longitudinally throughout early life. OBJECTIVES: We sought to study the long-term effects of exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) and to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on specific airway resistance (sR(aw)) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) before and after bronchodilator treatment. Subjects were from the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (MAAS) birth cohort (n = 1,185). METHODS: Spirometry was performed during clinic visits at ages 3, 5, 8, and 11 years. Individual-level PM10 and NO2 exposures were estimated from birth to 11 years of age through a microenvironmental exposure model. Longitudinal and cross-sectional associations were estimated using generalized estimating equations and multivariable linear regression models. RESULTS: Lifetime exposure to PM10 and NO2 was associated with significantly less growth in FEV1 (percent predicted) over time, both before (-1.37{\%}; 95{\%} CI: -2.52, -0.23 for a 1-unit increase in PM10 and -0.83{\%}; 95{\%} CI: -1.39, -0.28 for a 1-unit increase in NO2) and after bronchodilator treatment (-3.59{\%}; 95{\%} CI: -5.36, -1.83 and -1.20{\%}; 95{\%} CI: -1.97, -0.43, respectively). We found no association between lifetime exposure and sR(aw) over time. Cross-sectional analyses of detailed exposure estimates for the summer and winter before 11 years of age and lung function at 11 years indicated no significant associations. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term PM10 and NO2 exposures were associated with small but statistically significant reductions in lung volume growth in children of elementary-school age.",
author = "Anna M{\"o}lter and Agius, {Raymond M} and {de Vocht}, Frank and Sarah Lindley and William Gerrard and Lesley Lowe and Danielle Belgrave and Adnan Custovic and Angela Simpson",
note = "G0601361, Medical Research Council, United Kingdom, Medical Research Council, United Kingdom",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1289/ehp.1205961",
language = "English",
volume = "121",
pages = "1232--1238",
journal = "Environmental Health Perspectives",
issn = "0091-6765",
publisher = "Public Health Services, US Dept of Health and Human Services",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term exposure to PM10 and NO2 in association with lung volume and airway resistance in the MAAS birth cohort.

AU - Mölter, Anna

AU - Agius, Raymond M

AU - de Vocht, Frank

AU - Lindley, Sarah

AU - Gerrard, William

AU - Lowe, Lesley

AU - Belgrave, Danielle

AU - Custovic, Adnan

AU - Simpson, Angela

N1 - G0601361, Medical Research Council, United Kingdom, Medical Research Council, United Kingdom

PY - 2013/10

Y1 - 2013/10

N2 - BACKGROUND: Findings from previous studies on the effects of air pollution exposure on lung function during childhood have been inconsistent. A common limitation has been the quality of exposure data used, and few studies have modeled exposure longitudinally throughout early life. OBJECTIVES: We sought to study the long-term effects of exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) and to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on specific airway resistance (sR(aw)) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) before and after bronchodilator treatment. Subjects were from the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (MAAS) birth cohort (n = 1,185). METHODS: Spirometry was performed during clinic visits at ages 3, 5, 8, and 11 years. Individual-level PM10 and NO2 exposures were estimated from birth to 11 years of age through a microenvironmental exposure model. Longitudinal and cross-sectional associations were estimated using generalized estimating equations and multivariable linear regression models. RESULTS: Lifetime exposure to PM10 and NO2 was associated with significantly less growth in FEV1 (percent predicted) over time, both before (-1.37%; 95% CI: -2.52, -0.23 for a 1-unit increase in PM10 and -0.83%; 95% CI: -1.39, -0.28 for a 1-unit increase in NO2) and after bronchodilator treatment (-3.59%; 95% CI: -5.36, -1.83 and -1.20%; 95% CI: -1.97, -0.43, respectively). We found no association between lifetime exposure and sR(aw) over time. Cross-sectional analyses of detailed exposure estimates for the summer and winter before 11 years of age and lung function at 11 years indicated no significant associations. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term PM10 and NO2 exposures were associated with small but statistically significant reductions in lung volume growth in children of elementary-school age.

AB - BACKGROUND: Findings from previous studies on the effects of air pollution exposure on lung function during childhood have been inconsistent. A common limitation has been the quality of exposure data used, and few studies have modeled exposure longitudinally throughout early life. OBJECTIVES: We sought to study the long-term effects of exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) and to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on specific airway resistance (sR(aw)) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) before and after bronchodilator treatment. Subjects were from the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (MAAS) birth cohort (n = 1,185). METHODS: Spirometry was performed during clinic visits at ages 3, 5, 8, and 11 years. Individual-level PM10 and NO2 exposures were estimated from birth to 11 years of age through a microenvironmental exposure model. Longitudinal and cross-sectional associations were estimated using generalized estimating equations and multivariable linear regression models. RESULTS: Lifetime exposure to PM10 and NO2 was associated with significantly less growth in FEV1 (percent predicted) over time, both before (-1.37%; 95% CI: -2.52, -0.23 for a 1-unit increase in PM10 and -0.83%; 95% CI: -1.39, -0.28 for a 1-unit increase in NO2) and after bronchodilator treatment (-3.59%; 95% CI: -5.36, -1.83 and -1.20%; 95% CI: -1.97, -0.43, respectively). We found no association between lifetime exposure and sR(aw) over time. Cross-sectional analyses of detailed exposure estimates for the summer and winter before 11 years of age and lung function at 11 years indicated no significant associations. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term PM10 and NO2 exposures were associated with small but statistically significant reductions in lung volume growth in children of elementary-school age.

U2 - 10.1289/ehp.1205961

DO - 10.1289/ehp.1205961

M3 - Article

VL - 121

SP - 1232

EP - 1238

JO - Environmental Health Perspectives

T2 - Environmental Health Perspectives

JF - Environmental Health Perspectives

SN - 0091-6765

IS - 10

ER -