Longitudinal nailfold capillaroscopy tracking of microangiopathic changes in systemic sclerosisCitation formats

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@article{9f9fc6ee936c47ecb600d8d14942ffc0,
title = "Longitudinal nailfold capillaroscopy tracking of microangiopathic changes in systemic sclerosis",
abstract = "A 51-year-old female with a 20-year history of lcSSc (RP, sclerodactyly, digital pitting, ACA, abnormal nailfold capillaries) had no history of digital ulceration but developed calcinosis of several fingers. RP was relatively mild.Regular high-magnification (300×) capillaroscopic assessment (for research purposes) was recorded from 2002, ∼4 years post-diagnosis. The microscope system used throughout was a modified KK Technology system, Honiton, Devon, UK, with green LED illumination for maximum contrast and custom software allowing whole-nailfold mosaic images to be captured [1]. Seven images of the non-dominant ring finger were captured during the 9.9 year period ending August 2012 (See Fig. 1).The image sequence describes the progression of the nailfold microvasculature from an early/active scleroderma pattern [2] initially, with many enlarged and giant capillaries, through a period of relative avascularity, concluding with evidence of neoangiogenesis by the final image, and demonstrates the potential of capillaroscopy as a biomarker of microvascular disease. This tracking of change is possible via the image capture system, which combines high magnification with a whole nailfold view. Capillaroscopy provides a unique non-invasive window into evolution of SSc pathogenesis over time: in this patient, microvascular disease progression might be driving development of calcinosis.",
author = "Graham Dinsdale and {Van Roon}, Anniek and Andrea Murray and Christopher Taylor and Ariane Herrick",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1093/rheumatology/key029",
language = "English",
journal = "Rheumatology (Oxford)",
issn = "1462-0324",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Longitudinal nailfold capillaroscopy tracking of microangiopathic changes in systemic sclerosis

AU - Dinsdale, Graham

AU - Van Roon, Anniek

AU - Murray, Andrea

AU - Taylor, Christopher

AU - Herrick, Ariane

PY - 2018/2/28

Y1 - 2018/2/28

N2 - A 51-year-old female with a 20-year history of lcSSc (RP, sclerodactyly, digital pitting, ACA, abnormal nailfold capillaries) had no history of digital ulceration but developed calcinosis of several fingers. RP was relatively mild.Regular high-magnification (300×) capillaroscopic assessment (for research purposes) was recorded from 2002, ∼4 years post-diagnosis. The microscope system used throughout was a modified KK Technology system, Honiton, Devon, UK, with green LED illumination for maximum contrast and custom software allowing whole-nailfold mosaic images to be captured [1]. Seven images of the non-dominant ring finger were captured during the 9.9 year period ending August 2012 (See Fig. 1).The image sequence describes the progression of the nailfold microvasculature from an early/active scleroderma pattern [2] initially, with many enlarged and giant capillaries, through a period of relative avascularity, concluding with evidence of neoangiogenesis by the final image, and demonstrates the potential of capillaroscopy as a biomarker of microvascular disease. This tracking of change is possible via the image capture system, which combines high magnification with a whole nailfold view. Capillaroscopy provides a unique non-invasive window into evolution of SSc pathogenesis over time: in this patient, microvascular disease progression might be driving development of calcinosis.

AB - A 51-year-old female with a 20-year history of lcSSc (RP, sclerodactyly, digital pitting, ACA, abnormal nailfold capillaries) had no history of digital ulceration but developed calcinosis of several fingers. RP was relatively mild.Regular high-magnification (300×) capillaroscopic assessment (for research purposes) was recorded from 2002, ∼4 years post-diagnosis. The microscope system used throughout was a modified KK Technology system, Honiton, Devon, UK, with green LED illumination for maximum contrast and custom software allowing whole-nailfold mosaic images to be captured [1]. Seven images of the non-dominant ring finger were captured during the 9.9 year period ending August 2012 (See Fig. 1).The image sequence describes the progression of the nailfold microvasculature from an early/active scleroderma pattern [2] initially, with many enlarged and giant capillaries, through a period of relative avascularity, concluding with evidence of neoangiogenesis by the final image, and demonstrates the potential of capillaroscopy as a biomarker of microvascular disease. This tracking of change is possible via the image capture system, which combines high magnification with a whole nailfold view. Capillaroscopy provides a unique non-invasive window into evolution of SSc pathogenesis over time: in this patient, microvascular disease progression might be driving development of calcinosis.

U2 - 10.1093/rheumatology/key029

DO - 10.1093/rheumatology/key029

M3 - Article

JO - Rheumatology (Oxford)

JF - Rheumatology (Oxford)

SN - 1462-0324

ER -