Lifestyle and youthful looks.Citation formats

  • External authors:
  • D A Gunn
  • J L Dick
  • D van Heemst
  • C C Tomlin
  • P G Murray
  • T W Griffiths
  • S Ogden
  • A E Mayes
  • R G J Westendorp
  • P E Slagboom
  • A J M de Craen

Standard

Lifestyle and youthful looks. / Gunn, D A; Dick, J L; van Heemst, D; Griffiths, Christopher; Griffiths, CEM; Tomlin, C C; Murray, P G; Griffiths, T W; Ogden, S; Mayes, A E; Westendorp, R G J; Slagboom, P E; de Craen, A J M.

In: The British journal of dermatology, Vol. 172, No. 5, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Gunn, DA, Dick, JL, van Heemst, D, Griffiths, C, Griffiths, CEM, Tomlin, CC, Murray, PG, Griffiths, TW, Ogden, S, Mayes, AE, Westendorp, RGJ, Slagboom, PE & de Craen, AJM 2015, 'Lifestyle and youthful looks.', The British journal of dermatology, vol. 172, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.13646

APA

Gunn, D. A., Dick, J. L., van Heemst, D., Griffiths, C., Griffiths, CEM., Tomlin, C. C., Murray, P. G., Griffiths, T. W., Ogden, S., Mayes, A. E., Westendorp, R. G. J., Slagboom, P. E., & de Craen, A. J. M. (2015). Lifestyle and youthful looks. The British journal of dermatology, 172(5). https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.13646

Vancouver

Gunn DA, Dick JL, van Heemst D, Griffiths C, Griffiths CEM, Tomlin CC et al. Lifestyle and youthful looks. The British journal of dermatology. 2015;172(5). https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.13646

Author

Gunn, D A ; Dick, J L ; van Heemst, D ; Griffiths, Christopher ; Griffiths, CEM ; Tomlin, C C ; Murray, P G ; Griffiths, T W ; Ogden, S ; Mayes, A E ; Westendorp, R G J ; Slagboom, P E ; de Craen, A J M. / Lifestyle and youthful looks. In: The British journal of dermatology. 2015 ; Vol. 172, No. 5.

Bibtex

@article{19bb279a2ab541dc95c93ba073e647aa,
title = "Lifestyle and youthful looks.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Lifestyle has been proven to have a dramatic effect on the risk of age-related diseases. The association of lifestyle and facial ageing has been less well studied. OBJECTIVES: To identify lifestyle factors that associate with perceived facial age in white north European men and women. METHODS: Lifestyle, facial wrinkling and perceived facial age were studied in two cross-sectional studies consisting of 318 Dutch men and 329 women aged 45-75 years who were part of the Leiden Longevity Study, and 162 English women aged 45-75 years who were nonsmokers. RESULTS: In Dutch men, smoking, having skin that went red in the sun, being outside in the sun most of the summer, sunbed use, wearing false teeth and not flossing teeth were all significantly associated (P <0·05) with a total 9·3-year higher perceived facial age in a multivariate model adjusting for chronological age. In Dutch women, smoking, sunbathing, sunbed use, few remaining teeth and a low body mass index (BMI) were associated with a total 10·9-year higher perceived facial age. In English women, cleaning teeth only once a day, wearing false teeth, irregular skin moisturization and having skin that went red in the sun were associated with a total 9·1-year higher perceived facial age. Smoking and sunbed use were associated more strongly with wrinkling in women than in men. BMI, sun exposure and skincare were associated predominantly with perceived facial age via wrinkling, whereas oral care was associated via other facial features. CONCLUSIONS: Although associative in nature, these results support the notion that lifestyle factors can have long-term beneficial effects on youthful looks.",
author = "Gunn, {D A} and Dick, {J L} and {van Heemst}, D and Christopher Griffiths and CEM Griffiths and Tomlin, {C C} and Murray, {P G} and Griffiths, {T W} and S Ogden and Mayes, {A E} and Westendorp, {R G J} and Slagboom, {P E} and {de Craen}, {A J M}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/bjd.13646",
language = "English",
volume = "172",
journal = "British Journal of Dermatology",
issn = "0007-0963",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lifestyle and youthful looks.

AU - Gunn, D A

AU - Dick, J L

AU - van Heemst, D

AU - Griffiths, Christopher

AU - Griffiths, CEM

AU - Tomlin, C C

AU - Murray, P G

AU - Griffiths, T W

AU - Ogden, S

AU - Mayes, A E

AU - Westendorp, R G J

AU - Slagboom, P E

AU - de Craen, A J M

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - BACKGROUND: Lifestyle has been proven to have a dramatic effect on the risk of age-related diseases. The association of lifestyle and facial ageing has been less well studied. OBJECTIVES: To identify lifestyle factors that associate with perceived facial age in white north European men and women. METHODS: Lifestyle, facial wrinkling and perceived facial age were studied in two cross-sectional studies consisting of 318 Dutch men and 329 women aged 45-75 years who were part of the Leiden Longevity Study, and 162 English women aged 45-75 years who were nonsmokers. RESULTS: In Dutch men, smoking, having skin that went red in the sun, being outside in the sun most of the summer, sunbed use, wearing false teeth and not flossing teeth were all significantly associated (P <0·05) with a total 9·3-year higher perceived facial age in a multivariate model adjusting for chronological age. In Dutch women, smoking, sunbathing, sunbed use, few remaining teeth and a low body mass index (BMI) were associated with a total 10·9-year higher perceived facial age. In English women, cleaning teeth only once a day, wearing false teeth, irregular skin moisturization and having skin that went red in the sun were associated with a total 9·1-year higher perceived facial age. Smoking and sunbed use were associated more strongly with wrinkling in women than in men. BMI, sun exposure and skincare were associated predominantly with perceived facial age via wrinkling, whereas oral care was associated via other facial features. CONCLUSIONS: Although associative in nature, these results support the notion that lifestyle factors can have long-term beneficial effects on youthful looks.

AB - BACKGROUND: Lifestyle has been proven to have a dramatic effect on the risk of age-related diseases. The association of lifestyle and facial ageing has been less well studied. OBJECTIVES: To identify lifestyle factors that associate with perceived facial age in white north European men and women. METHODS: Lifestyle, facial wrinkling and perceived facial age were studied in two cross-sectional studies consisting of 318 Dutch men and 329 women aged 45-75 years who were part of the Leiden Longevity Study, and 162 English women aged 45-75 years who were nonsmokers. RESULTS: In Dutch men, smoking, having skin that went red in the sun, being outside in the sun most of the summer, sunbed use, wearing false teeth and not flossing teeth were all significantly associated (P <0·05) with a total 9·3-year higher perceived facial age in a multivariate model adjusting for chronological age. In Dutch women, smoking, sunbathing, sunbed use, few remaining teeth and a low body mass index (BMI) were associated with a total 10·9-year higher perceived facial age. In English women, cleaning teeth only once a day, wearing false teeth, irregular skin moisturization and having skin that went red in the sun were associated with a total 9·1-year higher perceived facial age. Smoking and sunbed use were associated more strongly with wrinkling in women than in men. BMI, sun exposure and skincare were associated predominantly with perceived facial age via wrinkling, whereas oral care was associated via other facial features. CONCLUSIONS: Although associative in nature, these results support the notion that lifestyle factors can have long-term beneficial effects on youthful looks.

U2 - 10.1111/bjd.13646

DO - 10.1111/bjd.13646

M3 - Article

C2 - 25627783

VL - 172

JO - British Journal of Dermatology

JF - British Journal of Dermatology

SN - 0007-0963

IS - 5

ER -