Lethal and nonlethal violence against an intimate female partner: Comparing male murderers to nonlethal abusers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Men's lethal and nonlethal violence against an intimate female partner are compared. Various risk factors are examined to compare men's lethal and nonlethal violence against an intimate woman partner. Relative to abusers, men who kill are generally more conventional with respect to childhood backgrounds, education, employment, and criminal careers, are more likely to be possessive and jealous, and are more likely to be separated from their partner at the time of the event. Men who kill are more likely to have used violence against a previous partner, to have sexually assaulted and strangled the victim, and to have used a weapon or instrument. However, they were less likely to have been drunk at the time of the event and/or to have previously used violence against the woman they killed. Overall, the findings do not support the notion of a simple progression from nonlethal to lethal violence and raise some dilemmas for the growing area of risk assessment. © 2007 Sage Publications.

Bibliographical metadata

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-353
Number of pages24
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2007