Impact of molecular speciation on crystal nucleation in polymorphic systems: The conundrum of γ glycine and molecular 'self poisoning'Citation formats

  • Authors:
  • Christopher S. Towler
  • Roger J. Davey
  • Robert W. Lancaster
  • Christopher J. Price

Standard

Impact of molecular speciation on crystal nucleation in polymorphic systems: The conundrum of γ glycine and molecular 'self poisoning'. / Towler, Christopher S.; Davey, Roger J.; Lancaster, Robert W.; Price, Christopher J.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 126, No. 41, 20.10.2004, p. 13347-13353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Towler, CS, Davey, RJ, Lancaster, RW & Price, CJ 2004, 'Impact of molecular speciation on crystal nucleation in polymorphic systems: The conundrum of γ glycine and molecular 'self poisoning'', Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 126, no. 41, pp. 13347-13353. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja047507k

APA

Towler, C. S., Davey, R. J., Lancaster, R. W., & Price, C. J. (2004). Impact of molecular speciation on crystal nucleation in polymorphic systems: The conundrum of γ glycine and molecular 'self poisoning'. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 126(41), 13347-13353. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja047507k

Vancouver

Author

Towler, Christopher S. ; Davey, Roger J. ; Lancaster, Robert W. ; Price, Christopher J. / Impact of molecular speciation on crystal nucleation in polymorphic systems: The conundrum of γ glycine and molecular 'self poisoning'. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2004 ; Vol. 126, No. 41. pp. 13347-13353.

Bibtex

@article{7f341d9e449a4e02ae5e0677a62b94be,
title = "Impact of molecular speciation on crystal nucleation in polymorphic systems: The conundrum of γ glycine and molecular 'self poisoning'",
abstract = "The polymorphism of the simple amino acid glycine has been known for almost a century. It is also known that in aqueous solutions, at the isoelectric point (p/5.9), the metastable α polymorph crystallizes, while the stable γ form of glycine only nucleates at high and low pH. Despite the importance of understanding the process by which crystals nucleate, the solution and solid-state chemistry underlying this simple observation have never been explored. In this contribution, we have combined solution chemistry, crystallization, and crystallographic data to investigate the mechanisms by which this effect occurs. It is concluded that solution speciation and the consequent interactions between charged species and developing crystal nuclei determine the structural outcome of the crystallization process.",
author = "Towler, {Christopher S.} and Davey, {Roger J.} and Lancaster, {Robert W.} and Price, {Christopher J.}",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1021/ja047507k",
language = "English",
volume = "126",
pages = "13347--13353",
journal = "American Chemical Society. Journal",
issn = "0002-7863",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "41",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of molecular speciation on crystal nucleation in polymorphic systems: The conundrum of γ glycine and molecular 'self poisoning'

AU - Towler, Christopher S.

AU - Davey, Roger J.

AU - Lancaster, Robert W.

AU - Price, Christopher J.

PY - 2004/10/20

Y1 - 2004/10/20

N2 - The polymorphism of the simple amino acid glycine has been known for almost a century. It is also known that in aqueous solutions, at the isoelectric point (p/5.9), the metastable α polymorph crystallizes, while the stable γ form of glycine only nucleates at high and low pH. Despite the importance of understanding the process by which crystals nucleate, the solution and solid-state chemistry underlying this simple observation have never been explored. In this contribution, we have combined solution chemistry, crystallization, and crystallographic data to investigate the mechanisms by which this effect occurs. It is concluded that solution speciation and the consequent interactions between charged species and developing crystal nuclei determine the structural outcome of the crystallization process.

AB - The polymorphism of the simple amino acid glycine has been known for almost a century. It is also known that in aqueous solutions, at the isoelectric point (p/5.9), the metastable α polymorph crystallizes, while the stable γ form of glycine only nucleates at high and low pH. Despite the importance of understanding the process by which crystals nucleate, the solution and solid-state chemistry underlying this simple observation have never been explored. In this contribution, we have combined solution chemistry, crystallization, and crystallographic data to investigate the mechanisms by which this effect occurs. It is concluded that solution speciation and the consequent interactions between charged species and developing crystal nuclei determine the structural outcome of the crystallization process.

U2 - 10.1021/ja047507k

DO - 10.1021/ja047507k

M3 - Article

VL - 126

SP - 13347

EP - 13353

JO - American Chemical Society. Journal

JF - American Chemical Society. Journal

SN - 0002-7863

IS - 41

ER -