IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool childrenCitation formats

  • External authors:
  • Lars Soderstrom
  • Staffan Ahlstedt
  • Ashley Woodcock
  • Adnan Custovic

Standard

IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children. / Simpson, Angela; Soderstrom, Lars; Ahlstedt, Staffan; Murray, Clare S.; Woodcock, Ashley; Custovic, Adnan.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 116, No. 4, 10.2005, p. 744-749.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Simpson, A, Soderstrom, L, Ahlstedt, S, Murray, CS, Woodcock, A & Custovic, A 2005, 'IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children' Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 116, no. 4, pp. 744-749. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2005.06.032

APA

Simpson, A., Soderstrom, L., Ahlstedt, S., Murray, C. S., Woodcock, A., & Custovic, A. (2005). IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 116(4), 744-749. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2005.06.032

Vancouver

Simpson A, Soderstrom L, Ahlstedt S, Murray CS, Woodcock A, Custovic A. IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2005 Oct;116(4):744-749. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2005.06.032

Author

Simpson, Angela ; Soderstrom, Lars ; Ahlstedt, Staffan ; Murray, Clare S. ; Woodcock, Ashley ; Custovic, Adnan. / IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2005 ; Vol. 116, No. 4. pp. 744-749.

Bibtex

@article{6f072eaf1231470f91ba9a4f85743dfd,
title = "IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children",
abstract = "Background: IgE-mediated sensitization is usually considered a dichotomous variable (either sensitized or not). Quantitative IgE antibody analysis may better predict the expression of wheeze. Objective: Within the context of a population-based birth cohort, we investigated the association among wheeze, lung function, and specific IgE antibody levels. Methods: Children (n = 521) were followed to age 5 years with repeated questionnaires, skin testing, and measurement of lung function (specific airway resistance) and specific serum IgE (ImmunoCAP). Results: Using specific IgE as a continuous variable, the risk of current wheeze increased significantly with increasing IgE to mite, cat, and dog (P <.0001). When IgE levels to these 3 allergens were summed, the probability of current wheeze increased 1.33-fold (95{\%} CI, 1.21-1.47; P <.0001) per logarithmic unit increase, corresponding to an odds ratio of 3.1 at 10 and 4.25 at 30 kUA/L (kilo units of Allergen per liter). Similarly, increasing sum of mite-specific, cat-specific, and dog-specific IgE was associated with reduced lung function (P = .004). Among sensitized children (n = 184), the sum of mite, cat, and dog IgE was the strongest associate of current wheeze (odds ratio, 1.28; 95{\%} CI, 1.13-1.46; P <.001), corresponding to an odds ratio of 2.56 at 10 and 3.32 at 30 kUA/L. There was no association between current wheeze and the size of skin test wheal. Furthermore, the sum of IgE to mite, cat, and dog at age 3 years increased the risk of persistent wheeze by age 5 years (2.15-fold/logarithmic unit increase in the specific IgE). Conclusion: IgE-mediated sensitization is not an all or nothing phenomenon. The probability of wheeze and reduced lung function increases with increasing specific IgE antibody levels. {\circledC} 2005 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.",
keywords = "IgE antibody, Quantitative assay, specific airway resistance, Wheeze",
author = "Angela Simpson and Lars Soderstrom and Staffan Ahlstedt and Murray, {Clare S.} and Ashley Woodcock and Adnan Custovic",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaci.2005.06.032",
language = "English",
volume = "116",
pages = "744--749",
journal = "Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
issn = "0091-6749",
publisher = "Mosby, Inc.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - IgE antibody quantification and the probability of wheeze in preschool children

AU - Simpson, Angela

AU - Soderstrom, Lars

AU - Ahlstedt, Staffan

AU - Murray, Clare S.

AU - Woodcock, Ashley

AU - Custovic, Adnan

PY - 2005/10

Y1 - 2005/10

N2 - Background: IgE-mediated sensitization is usually considered a dichotomous variable (either sensitized or not). Quantitative IgE antibody analysis may better predict the expression of wheeze. Objective: Within the context of a population-based birth cohort, we investigated the association among wheeze, lung function, and specific IgE antibody levels. Methods: Children (n = 521) were followed to age 5 years with repeated questionnaires, skin testing, and measurement of lung function (specific airway resistance) and specific serum IgE (ImmunoCAP). Results: Using specific IgE as a continuous variable, the risk of current wheeze increased significantly with increasing IgE to mite, cat, and dog (P <.0001). When IgE levels to these 3 allergens were summed, the probability of current wheeze increased 1.33-fold (95% CI, 1.21-1.47; P <.0001) per logarithmic unit increase, corresponding to an odds ratio of 3.1 at 10 and 4.25 at 30 kUA/L (kilo units of Allergen per liter). Similarly, increasing sum of mite-specific, cat-specific, and dog-specific IgE was associated with reduced lung function (P = .004). Among sensitized children (n = 184), the sum of mite, cat, and dog IgE was the strongest associate of current wheeze (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.46; P <.001), corresponding to an odds ratio of 2.56 at 10 and 3.32 at 30 kUA/L. There was no association between current wheeze and the size of skin test wheal. Furthermore, the sum of IgE to mite, cat, and dog at age 3 years increased the risk of persistent wheeze by age 5 years (2.15-fold/logarithmic unit increase in the specific IgE). Conclusion: IgE-mediated sensitization is not an all or nothing phenomenon. The probability of wheeze and reduced lung function increases with increasing specific IgE antibody levels. © 2005 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

AB - Background: IgE-mediated sensitization is usually considered a dichotomous variable (either sensitized or not). Quantitative IgE antibody analysis may better predict the expression of wheeze. Objective: Within the context of a population-based birth cohort, we investigated the association among wheeze, lung function, and specific IgE antibody levels. Methods: Children (n = 521) were followed to age 5 years with repeated questionnaires, skin testing, and measurement of lung function (specific airway resistance) and specific serum IgE (ImmunoCAP). Results: Using specific IgE as a continuous variable, the risk of current wheeze increased significantly with increasing IgE to mite, cat, and dog (P <.0001). When IgE levels to these 3 allergens were summed, the probability of current wheeze increased 1.33-fold (95% CI, 1.21-1.47; P <.0001) per logarithmic unit increase, corresponding to an odds ratio of 3.1 at 10 and 4.25 at 30 kUA/L (kilo units of Allergen per liter). Similarly, increasing sum of mite-specific, cat-specific, and dog-specific IgE was associated with reduced lung function (P = .004). Among sensitized children (n = 184), the sum of mite, cat, and dog IgE was the strongest associate of current wheeze (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.46; P <.001), corresponding to an odds ratio of 2.56 at 10 and 3.32 at 30 kUA/L. There was no association between current wheeze and the size of skin test wheal. Furthermore, the sum of IgE to mite, cat, and dog at age 3 years increased the risk of persistent wheeze by age 5 years (2.15-fold/logarithmic unit increase in the specific IgE). Conclusion: IgE-mediated sensitization is not an all or nothing phenomenon. The probability of wheeze and reduced lung function increases with increasing specific IgE antibody levels. © 2005 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

KW - IgE antibody

KW - Quantitative assay

KW - specific airway resistance

KW - Wheeze

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaci.2005.06.032

DO - 10.1016/j.jaci.2005.06.032

M3 - Article

VL - 116

SP - 744

EP - 749

JO - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN - 0091-6749

IS - 4

ER -