How intensive does anomia therapy for people with aphasia need to be?Citation formats

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How intensive does anomia therapy for people with aphasia need to be? / Sage, Karen; Snell, Claerwen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

In: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 26-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Sage, K, Snell, C & Lambon Ralph, MA 2011, 'How intensive does anomia therapy for people with aphasia need to be?', Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 26-41. https://doi.org/10.1080/09602011.2010.528966

APA

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Author

Sage, Karen ; Snell, Claerwen ; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A. / How intensive does anomia therapy for people with aphasia need to be?. In: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 26-41.

Bibtex

@article{b982a0b53bd841baba2bb847318cd3c9,
title = "How intensive does anomia therapy for people with aphasia need to be?",
abstract = "The intensity of aphasia therapy has been a key clinical question. The aim of this case-series study was to compare the outcome of intensive and non-intensive therapy in the relearning of words for people with aphasia. Eight participants took part in a study comparing the intensity of delivery of the therapy. Participants received two courses of the same therapy (each lasting 10 sessions) delivered either intensively or non-intensively. Therapy consisted of confrontation naming with progressive phonemic and orthographic cues. Post-therapy assessments were carried out immediately after the study and one month later. Performance was also monitored during each therapy session. Immediately post-therapy, both types of therapy had improved naming accuracy considerably and there was no significant difference between the two interventions. One month later, seven out of eight participants showed a small yet significant difference in naming accuracy, favouring non-intensive over intense therapy. There were no differences in the learning patterns during the therapy sessions between the intensive and non-intensive therapies. For the majority of people with aphasia post-stroke, both intense and non-intense therapy for anomia leads to improved naming performance. Retention at one-month post therapy is relatively superior after non-intensive therapy. {\circledC} 2010 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group.",
keywords = "Anomia, Aphasia, Intensity, Learning, Therapy",
author = "Karen Sage and Claerwen Snell and {Lambon Ralph}, {Matthew A.}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1080/09602011.2010.528966",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "26--41",
journal = "Neuropsychological Rehabilitation",
issn = "0960-2011",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How intensive does anomia therapy for people with aphasia need to be?

AU - Sage, Karen

AU - Snell, Claerwen

AU - Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

PY - 2011/1

Y1 - 2011/1

N2 - The intensity of aphasia therapy has been a key clinical question. The aim of this case-series study was to compare the outcome of intensive and non-intensive therapy in the relearning of words for people with aphasia. Eight participants took part in a study comparing the intensity of delivery of the therapy. Participants received two courses of the same therapy (each lasting 10 sessions) delivered either intensively or non-intensively. Therapy consisted of confrontation naming with progressive phonemic and orthographic cues. Post-therapy assessments were carried out immediately after the study and one month later. Performance was also monitored during each therapy session. Immediately post-therapy, both types of therapy had improved naming accuracy considerably and there was no significant difference between the two interventions. One month later, seven out of eight participants showed a small yet significant difference in naming accuracy, favouring non-intensive over intense therapy. There were no differences in the learning patterns during the therapy sessions between the intensive and non-intensive therapies. For the majority of people with aphasia post-stroke, both intense and non-intense therapy for anomia leads to improved naming performance. Retention at one-month post therapy is relatively superior after non-intensive therapy. © 2010 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group.

AB - The intensity of aphasia therapy has been a key clinical question. The aim of this case-series study was to compare the outcome of intensive and non-intensive therapy in the relearning of words for people with aphasia. Eight participants took part in a study comparing the intensity of delivery of the therapy. Participants received two courses of the same therapy (each lasting 10 sessions) delivered either intensively or non-intensively. Therapy consisted of confrontation naming with progressive phonemic and orthographic cues. Post-therapy assessments were carried out immediately after the study and one month later. Performance was also monitored during each therapy session. Immediately post-therapy, both types of therapy had improved naming accuracy considerably and there was no significant difference between the two interventions. One month later, seven out of eight participants showed a small yet significant difference in naming accuracy, favouring non-intensive over intense therapy. There were no differences in the learning patterns during the therapy sessions between the intensive and non-intensive therapies. For the majority of people with aphasia post-stroke, both intense and non-intense therapy for anomia leads to improved naming performance. Retention at one-month post therapy is relatively superior after non-intensive therapy. © 2010 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group.

KW - Anomia

KW - Aphasia

KW - Intensity

KW - Learning

KW - Therapy

U2 - 10.1080/09602011.2010.528966

DO - 10.1080/09602011.2010.528966

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 26

EP - 41

JO - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

T2 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

JF - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

SN - 0960-2011

IS - 1

ER -