Health Technology Adoption in Liver Disease: Innovative Use of Data Science Solutions for Early Disease Detection

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  • External authors:
  • Lucy Bennett
  • Huw Purssell
  • Oliver Street
  • Joanne R Morling
  • Indra Neil Guha

Abstract

Chronic liver disease (CLD) is an ignored epidemic. Premature mortality is considerable and in the United Kingdom (UK) liver disease is in the top three for inequitable healthcare alongside heart and respiratory disease. Fifty percentage of patients with CLD are first diagnosed with cirrhosis after an emergency presentation translating to poorer patient outcomes. Traditional models of care have been based in secondary care when the need is at community level. Investigating patients for disease based on their risk factors at a population level in the community will identify its presence early when there is potential reversibility. Innovation is needed in three broad areas to improve clinical care in this area: better access to diagnostics within the community, integrating diagnostics across primary and secondary care and utilizing digital healthcare to enhance patient care. In this article, we describe how the Integrated Diagnostics for Early Detection of Liver Disease (ID-LIVER) project, funded by UK Research and Innovation, is developing solutions in Greater Manchester to approach the issue of diagnosis of liver disease at a population level. The ambition is to build on innovative pathways previously established in Nottingham by bringing together NHS organizations, academic partners and commercial organizations. The motivation is to co-create and implement a commercial solution that integrates multimodal diagnostics via cutting edge data science to drive growth and disrupt the currently inadequate model. The ambitious vision is for this to be widely adopted for early diagnosis and stratification of liver disease at a population level within the NHS.

Bibliographical metadata

Original languageEnglish
Article number737729
JournalFrontiers in Digital Health
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jan 2022