Expressive Content and Speaker DependenceCitation formats

Standard

Expressive Content and Speaker Dependence. / Stevens, Graham; Duckett, Nathan.

In: Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations, Vol. 18, 10.08.2018, p. 97-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Stevens, G & Duckett, N 2018, 'Expressive Content and Speaker Dependence', Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations, vol. 18, pp. 97-112. https://doi.org/10.22381/LPI1820195

APA

Stevens, G., & Duckett, N. (2018). Expressive Content and Speaker Dependence. Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations, 18, 97-112. https://doi.org/10.22381/LPI1820195

Vancouver

Stevens G, Duckett N. Expressive Content and Speaker Dependence. Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations. 2018 Aug 10;18:97-112. https://doi.org/10.22381/LPI1820195

Author

Stevens, Graham ; Duckett, Nathan. / Expressive Content and Speaker Dependence. In: Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations. 2018 ; Vol. 18. pp. 97-112.

Bibtex

@article{553ad9d8262045478b392dde635259d7,
title = "Expressive Content and Speaker Dependence",
abstract = "Expressives are lexical items which encode attitudes. Original semantic theories for expressives assumed that this attitude was always the speaker{\textquoteright}s, however, a number of apparent counter-examples have motived recent theorists to endorse the view that expressives can be shifted to non-speaker-oriented readings under which they express attitudes of a salient judge, distinct from the speaker. We argue that this rejection of speaker dependence for expressives is too hasty, arguing that: (1) the counter-examples are uncon- vincing, and (2) reflection on other puzzling uses of expressives that we introduce here suggest that speaker dependence ought to be preserved as a universal semantic feature of expressive content. Apparent cases of perspective shifting, we argue, are best understood as resulting from pragmatic, rather than semantic, operations.",
author = "Graham Stevens and Nathan Duckett",
year = "2018",
month = aug,
day = "10",
doi = "10.22381/LPI1820195",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "97--112",
journal = "Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations",
issn = "1841-2394",
publisher = "Addleton Academic Publishers",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Expressive Content and Speaker Dependence

AU - Stevens, Graham

AU - Duckett, Nathan

PY - 2018/8/10

Y1 - 2018/8/10

N2 - Expressives are lexical items which encode attitudes. Original semantic theories for expressives assumed that this attitude was always the speaker’s, however, a number of apparent counter-examples have motived recent theorists to endorse the view that expressives can be shifted to non-speaker-oriented readings under which they express attitudes of a salient judge, distinct from the speaker. We argue that this rejection of speaker dependence for expressives is too hasty, arguing that: (1) the counter-examples are uncon- vincing, and (2) reflection on other puzzling uses of expressives that we introduce here suggest that speaker dependence ought to be preserved as a universal semantic feature of expressive content. Apparent cases of perspective shifting, we argue, are best understood as resulting from pragmatic, rather than semantic, operations.

AB - Expressives are lexical items which encode attitudes. Original semantic theories for expressives assumed that this attitude was always the speaker’s, however, a number of apparent counter-examples have motived recent theorists to endorse the view that expressives can be shifted to non-speaker-oriented readings under which they express attitudes of a salient judge, distinct from the speaker. We argue that this rejection of speaker dependence for expressives is too hasty, arguing that: (1) the counter-examples are uncon- vincing, and (2) reflection on other puzzling uses of expressives that we introduce here suggest that speaker dependence ought to be preserved as a universal semantic feature of expressive content. Apparent cases of perspective shifting, we argue, are best understood as resulting from pragmatic, rather than semantic, operations.

U2 - 10.22381/LPI1820195

DO - 10.22381/LPI1820195

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 97

EP - 112

JO - Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations

JF - Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations

SN - 1841-2394

ER -