E-participationCitation formats

Standard

E-participation. / Cantijoch Cunill, Marta; Gibson, Rachel.

Oxford Research Encyclopedias: Politics. Oxford University Press, 2019.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

Harvard

Cantijoch Cunill, M & Gibson, R 2019, E-participation. in Oxford Research Encyclopedias: Politics. Oxford University Press.

APA

Cantijoch Cunill, M., & Gibson, R. (2019). E-participation. In Oxford Research Encyclopedias: Politics Oxford University Press.

Vancouver

Cantijoch Cunill M, Gibson R. E-participation. In Oxford Research Encyclopedias: Politics. Oxford University Press. 2019

Author

Cantijoch Cunill, Marta ; Gibson, Rachel. / E-participation. Oxford Research Encyclopedias: Politics. Oxford University Press, 2019.

Bibtex

@inbook{bd70785f6a9a479e81e073853677f438,
title = "E-participation",
abstract = "The study of e-participation is a young and growing discipline in which controversies are vibrant. One of these is the lack of a widely accepted definition of “e-participation.” Online political activities that involve little effort from the participant, such as liking or sharing political content on social media, are particularly divisive. Some scholars are reluctant to label expressive forms of online behavior as political participation. Others argue in favor of an adaptation of previous definitions to accommodate recent technological changes. Levels of engagement in different types of e-participation are increasing steadily over time. While differences between democracies are often stark, the upward trend has been consistent, especially since the emergence and expansion of social media. Whether this means that previously unengaged individuals are now taking part is one of the central questions of the literature on e-participation. To date, research has shown positive but modest results in support for a mobilizing effect. Particularly promising are findings suggesting that online tools are attracting younger participants to the political arena. Online forms of political engagement are often placed in a more general process leading to online and offline political participation. “Lean-forward” models that provide a contextualized understanding of the drivers and effects of e-participation are particularly insightful. In order to provide robustness to some of the questions that remain unresolved, scholars exploring eparticipation should consider expanding their methodological repertoires. The trend is toward mixed designs that combine surveys and other forms of data (big data collected from social media or qualitative data).",
keywords = "e-participation, political participation, political engagement, political behaviour, Internet, social media, digital technologies",
author = "{Cantijoch Cunill}, Marta and Rachel Gibson",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Oxford Research Encyclopedias",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - E-participation

AU - Cantijoch Cunill, Marta

AU - Gibson, Rachel

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - The study of e-participation is a young and growing discipline in which controversies are vibrant. One of these is the lack of a widely accepted definition of “e-participation.” Online political activities that involve little effort from the participant, such as liking or sharing political content on social media, are particularly divisive. Some scholars are reluctant to label expressive forms of online behavior as political participation. Others argue in favor of an adaptation of previous definitions to accommodate recent technological changes. Levels of engagement in different types of e-participation are increasing steadily over time. While differences between democracies are often stark, the upward trend has been consistent, especially since the emergence and expansion of social media. Whether this means that previously unengaged individuals are now taking part is one of the central questions of the literature on e-participation. To date, research has shown positive but modest results in support for a mobilizing effect. Particularly promising are findings suggesting that online tools are attracting younger participants to the political arena. Online forms of political engagement are often placed in a more general process leading to online and offline political participation. “Lean-forward” models that provide a contextualized understanding of the drivers and effects of e-participation are particularly insightful. In order to provide robustness to some of the questions that remain unresolved, scholars exploring eparticipation should consider expanding their methodological repertoires. The trend is toward mixed designs that combine surveys and other forms of data (big data collected from social media or qualitative data).

AB - The study of e-participation is a young and growing discipline in which controversies are vibrant. One of these is the lack of a widely accepted definition of “e-participation.” Online political activities that involve little effort from the participant, such as liking or sharing political content on social media, are particularly divisive. Some scholars are reluctant to label expressive forms of online behavior as political participation. Others argue in favor of an adaptation of previous definitions to accommodate recent technological changes. Levels of engagement in different types of e-participation are increasing steadily over time. While differences between democracies are often stark, the upward trend has been consistent, especially since the emergence and expansion of social media. Whether this means that previously unengaged individuals are now taking part is one of the central questions of the literature on e-participation. To date, research has shown positive but modest results in support for a mobilizing effect. Particularly promising are findings suggesting that online tools are attracting younger participants to the political arena. Online forms of political engagement are often placed in a more general process leading to online and offline political participation. “Lean-forward” models that provide a contextualized understanding of the drivers and effects of e-participation are particularly insightful. In order to provide robustness to some of the questions that remain unresolved, scholars exploring eparticipation should consider expanding their methodological repertoires. The trend is toward mixed designs that combine surveys and other forms of data (big data collected from social media or qualitative data).

KW - e-participation

KW - political participation

KW - political engagement

KW - political behaviour

KW - Internet

KW - social media

KW - digital technologies

M3 - Entry for encyclopedia/dictionary

BT - Oxford Research Encyclopedias

PB - Oxford University Press

ER -