Election Outcomes and Individual Subjective Wellbeing in Great BritainCitation formats

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Election Outcomes and Individual Subjective Wellbeing in Great Britain. / Munford, Luke; Gray, Daniel ; Pickard, Harry.

In: Economica, Vol. 88, No. 351, 16.02.2021, p. 809-837.

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Munford, Luke ; Gray, Daniel ; Pickard, Harry. / Election Outcomes and Individual Subjective Wellbeing in Great Britain. In: Economica. 2021 ; Vol. 88, No. 351. pp. 809-837.

Bibtex

@article{6a35dd5ff9244781ae54066ebd1a6f53,
title = "Election Outcomes and Individual Subjective Wellbeing in Great Britain",
abstract = "Exploiting novel longitudinal data on individuals in Great Britain matched to their parliamentary constituency, we find that supporting the incumbent political party, at both the national and constituency levels, exerts a positive influence on individual subjective wellbeing. This relationship varies across different measures of subjective wellbeing, gender and personal characteristics. We then implement a regression discontinuity in time design to estimate the impact of a quasi‐natural experiment, where we exploit the timing of the survey around the 2010 election date in order to identify a causal relationship. We find that Liberal Democrat supporters have approximately one‐unit higher level of overall life satisfaction after their party{\textquoteright}s electoral success.",
author = "Luke Munford and Daniel Gray and Harry Pickard",
note = "Funding Information: This paper benefited from comments from Sarah Brown, Georgios Efthyvoulou, seminar participants at the University of Sheffield, City University London and the 2019 European Society for Population Economics, and three anonymous referees. We are grateful to the Data Archive at the University of Essex for supplying the data. Understanding Society and BHPS are funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and various Government Departments, with scientific leadership by the Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, and survey delivery by NatCen Social Research and Kantar Public. The research data are distributed by the UK Data Service. Any remaining errors are our own. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. Economica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of London School of Economics and Political Science.",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
day = "16",
doi = "10.1111/ecca.12362",
language = "English",
volume = "88",
pages = "809--837",
journal = "Economica",
issn = "0013-0427",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "351",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Election Outcomes and Individual Subjective Wellbeing in Great Britain

AU - Munford, Luke

AU - Gray, Daniel

AU - Pickard, Harry

N1 - Funding Information: This paper benefited from comments from Sarah Brown, Georgios Efthyvoulou, seminar participants at the University of Sheffield, City University London and the 2019 European Society for Population Economics, and three anonymous referees. We are grateful to the Data Archive at the University of Essex for supplying the data. Understanding Society and BHPS are funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and various Government Departments, with scientific leadership by the Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, and survey delivery by NatCen Social Research and Kantar Public. The research data are distributed by the UK Data Service. Any remaining errors are our own. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Economica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of London School of Economics and Political Science.

PY - 2021/2/16

Y1 - 2021/2/16

N2 - Exploiting novel longitudinal data on individuals in Great Britain matched to their parliamentary constituency, we find that supporting the incumbent political party, at both the national and constituency levels, exerts a positive influence on individual subjective wellbeing. This relationship varies across different measures of subjective wellbeing, gender and personal characteristics. We then implement a regression discontinuity in time design to estimate the impact of a quasi‐natural experiment, where we exploit the timing of the survey around the 2010 election date in order to identify a causal relationship. We find that Liberal Democrat supporters have approximately one‐unit higher level of overall life satisfaction after their party’s electoral success.

AB - Exploiting novel longitudinal data on individuals in Great Britain matched to their parliamentary constituency, we find that supporting the incumbent political party, at both the national and constituency levels, exerts a positive influence on individual subjective wellbeing. This relationship varies across different measures of subjective wellbeing, gender and personal characteristics. We then implement a regression discontinuity in time design to estimate the impact of a quasi‐natural experiment, where we exploit the timing of the survey around the 2010 election date in order to identify a causal relationship. We find that Liberal Democrat supporters have approximately one‐unit higher level of overall life satisfaction after their party’s electoral success.

U2 - 10.1111/ecca.12362

DO - 10.1111/ecca.12362

M3 - Article

VL - 88

SP - 809

EP - 837

JO - Economica

JF - Economica

SN - 0013-0427

IS - 351

ER -