Effect of addition of salmeterol versus doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate on specific airway resistance in children with asthma.Citation formats

  • External authors:
  • Adnan Custovic
  • Lesley A Lowe
  • Sarah Aldington
  • Mathew Williams
  • Richard Beasley
  • Ashley Woodcock

Standard

Effect of addition of salmeterol versus doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate on specific airway resistance in children with asthma. / Murray, Clare S; Custovic, Adnan; Lowe, Lesley A; Aldington, Sarah; Williams, Mathew; Beasley, Richard; Woodcock, Ashley.

In: Allergy and asthma proceedings : the official journal of regional and state allergy societies, Vol. 31, No. 5, 2010, p. 415-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Murray, CS, Custovic, A, Lowe, LA, Aldington, S, Williams, M, Beasley, R & Woodcock, A 2010, 'Effect of addition of salmeterol versus doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate on specific airway resistance in children with asthma.' Allergy and asthma proceedings : the official journal of regional and state allergy societies, vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 415-421. https://doi.org/10.2500/aap.2010.31.3362

APA

Murray, C. S., Custovic, A., Lowe, L. A., Aldington, S., Williams, M., Beasley, R., & Woodcock, A. (2010). Effect of addition of salmeterol versus doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate on specific airway resistance in children with asthma. Allergy and asthma proceedings : the official journal of regional and state allergy societies, 31(5), 415-421. https://doi.org/10.2500/aap.2010.31.3362

Vancouver

Murray CS, Custovic A, Lowe LA, Aldington S, Williams M, Beasley R et al. Effect of addition of salmeterol versus doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate on specific airway resistance in children with asthma. Allergy and asthma proceedings : the official journal of regional and state allergy societies. 2010;31(5):415-421. https://doi.org/10.2500/aap.2010.31.3362

Author

Murray, Clare S ; Custovic, Adnan ; Lowe, Lesley A ; Aldington, Sarah ; Williams, Mathew ; Beasley, Richard ; Woodcock, Ashley. / Effect of addition of salmeterol versus doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate on specific airway resistance in children with asthma. In: Allergy and asthma proceedings : the official journal of regional and state allergy societies. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 415-421.

Bibtex

@article{4434a620576e4938aa1e432095039268,
title = "Effect of addition of salmeterol versus doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate on specific airway resistance in children with asthma.",
abstract = "Based primarily on extrapolation from adult studies, current pediatric asthma guidelines advise the addition of long-acting beta₂-agonists for children symptomatic on low/moderate-dose inhaled corticosteroids before increasing the corticosteroid dose. This study was designed to compare the effect of combination salmeterol/fluticasone propionate (SFC) with doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate (FP) on specific airway resistance (sR(aw)) in moderate/severe persistent asthmatic children. A double-blind, randomized, controlled study was performed; children with asthma (4-11 years old; sR(aw) > 1.3 kPa·s) were randomized after a 2-week run-in (FP, 100 μg, b.i.d.) to either SFC (50 μg/100 μg b.i.d.) or FP (200 μg b.i.d.) via Diskus (GlaxoSmithKline, Stockley Park, U.K.) for 6 weeks. Lung function (sR(aw)-plethysmography and forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV₁]) was measured before run-in, at randomization, after 3 weeks, at the end of 6-week treatment, and after 48-hour washout. Symptom scores and rescue medication use were recorded throughout. Thirty-five children entered run-in and 24 were randomized (mean age, 7.3 ± 2.2 years; 50{\%} boys). All children showed an improvement in sR(aw). After adjusting for age, gender, and baseline sR(aw,) children receiving SFC had a significantly greater improvement in sR(aw) compared with those receiving FP (adjusted means ratio [95{\%} confidence interval {CI}], 0.81 [0.68-0.97]; p = 0.021). There was a significant interaction between treatment and gender (sR(aw), adjusted geometric mean [95{\%} CI ]kPa·s, SFC versus FP: boys, 1.25 [1.10-1.41] [n = 7] versus 1.87 [1.61-2.17] [n = 5]; girls, 1.29 [1.10-1.52] [n = 5] versus 1.29 [1.13-1.47] [n = 7]; p = 0.008). There were no differences in FEV₁, symptoms, or rescue medication use between the groups. Addition of salmeterol provides greater improvement in sR(aw) than doubling the dose of FP in children with moderate/severe persistent asthma.",
author = "Murray, {Clare S} and Adnan Custovic and Lowe, {Lesley A} and Sarah Aldington and Mathew Williams and Richard Beasley and Ashley Woodcock",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.2500/aap.2010.31.3362",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "415--421",
journal = "Allergy and Asthma Proceedings",
issn = "1088-5412",
publisher = "OceanSide Publications Inc.",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of addition of salmeterol versus doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate on specific airway resistance in children with asthma.

AU - Murray, Clare S

AU - Custovic, Adnan

AU - Lowe, Lesley A

AU - Aldington, Sarah

AU - Williams, Mathew

AU - Beasley, Richard

AU - Woodcock, Ashley

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Based primarily on extrapolation from adult studies, current pediatric asthma guidelines advise the addition of long-acting beta₂-agonists for children symptomatic on low/moderate-dose inhaled corticosteroids before increasing the corticosteroid dose. This study was designed to compare the effect of combination salmeterol/fluticasone propionate (SFC) with doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate (FP) on specific airway resistance (sR(aw)) in moderate/severe persistent asthmatic children. A double-blind, randomized, controlled study was performed; children with asthma (4-11 years old; sR(aw) > 1.3 kPa·s) were randomized after a 2-week run-in (FP, 100 μg, b.i.d.) to either SFC (50 μg/100 μg b.i.d.) or FP (200 μg b.i.d.) via Diskus (GlaxoSmithKline, Stockley Park, U.K.) for 6 weeks. Lung function (sR(aw)-plethysmography and forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV₁]) was measured before run-in, at randomization, after 3 weeks, at the end of 6-week treatment, and after 48-hour washout. Symptom scores and rescue medication use were recorded throughout. Thirty-five children entered run-in and 24 were randomized (mean age, 7.3 ± 2.2 years; 50% boys). All children showed an improvement in sR(aw). After adjusting for age, gender, and baseline sR(aw,) children receiving SFC had a significantly greater improvement in sR(aw) compared with those receiving FP (adjusted means ratio [95% confidence interval {CI}], 0.81 [0.68-0.97]; p = 0.021). There was a significant interaction between treatment and gender (sR(aw), adjusted geometric mean [95% CI ]kPa·s, SFC versus FP: boys, 1.25 [1.10-1.41] [n = 7] versus 1.87 [1.61-2.17] [n = 5]; girls, 1.29 [1.10-1.52] [n = 5] versus 1.29 [1.13-1.47] [n = 7]; p = 0.008). There were no differences in FEV₁, symptoms, or rescue medication use between the groups. Addition of salmeterol provides greater improvement in sR(aw) than doubling the dose of FP in children with moderate/severe persistent asthma.

AB - Based primarily on extrapolation from adult studies, current pediatric asthma guidelines advise the addition of long-acting beta₂-agonists for children symptomatic on low/moderate-dose inhaled corticosteroids before increasing the corticosteroid dose. This study was designed to compare the effect of combination salmeterol/fluticasone propionate (SFC) with doubling the dose of fluticasone propionate (FP) on specific airway resistance (sR(aw)) in moderate/severe persistent asthmatic children. A double-blind, randomized, controlled study was performed; children with asthma (4-11 years old; sR(aw) > 1.3 kPa·s) were randomized after a 2-week run-in (FP, 100 μg, b.i.d.) to either SFC (50 μg/100 μg b.i.d.) or FP (200 μg b.i.d.) via Diskus (GlaxoSmithKline, Stockley Park, U.K.) for 6 weeks. Lung function (sR(aw)-plethysmography and forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV₁]) was measured before run-in, at randomization, after 3 weeks, at the end of 6-week treatment, and after 48-hour washout. Symptom scores and rescue medication use were recorded throughout. Thirty-five children entered run-in and 24 were randomized (mean age, 7.3 ± 2.2 years; 50% boys). All children showed an improvement in sR(aw). After adjusting for age, gender, and baseline sR(aw,) children receiving SFC had a significantly greater improvement in sR(aw) compared with those receiving FP (adjusted means ratio [95% confidence interval {CI}], 0.81 [0.68-0.97]; p = 0.021). There was a significant interaction between treatment and gender (sR(aw), adjusted geometric mean [95% CI ]kPa·s, SFC versus FP: boys, 1.25 [1.10-1.41] [n = 7] versus 1.87 [1.61-2.17] [n = 5]; girls, 1.29 [1.10-1.52] [n = 5] versus 1.29 [1.13-1.47] [n = 7]; p = 0.008). There were no differences in FEV₁, symptoms, or rescue medication use between the groups. Addition of salmeterol provides greater improvement in sR(aw) than doubling the dose of FP in children with moderate/severe persistent asthma.

U2 - 10.2500/aap.2010.31.3362

DO - 10.2500/aap.2010.31.3362

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 415

EP - 421

JO - Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

JF - Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

SN - 1088-5412

IS - 5

ER -