Does receiving high or low breast cancer risk estimates produce a reduction in subsequent breast cancer screening attendance? Cohort studyCitation formats

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@article{52a64022f61d4b96a5d21c647a516a4e,
title = "Does receiving high or low breast cancer risk estimates produce a reduction in subsequent breast cancer screening attendance? Cohort study",
abstract = "Risk-stratified breast cancer screening may improve the balance of screening benefits to harms.We assess a potential new harm: reduced screening attendance in women receiving below average-risk (false reassurance) or higher-risk results (screening avoidance). Following initial screening, 26,668 women in the PROCAS study received breast cancer risk estimates, with attendance recorded for two subsequent screening rounds. First-screen attendance was slightly reduced in below-average (85.6%) but not higher-risk women, compared to other women (86.4%). Second-screen attendance increased for women at higher-risk (89.2%) but not below-average, compared to other women (78.8%). Concerns about this potential harm of risk-stratified screening therefore appear unfounded.",
author = "French, {David P.} and Lorna McWilliams and Anthony Howell and Evans, {D Gareth}",
year = "2022",
month = may,
day = "5",
language = "English",
journal = "The Breast",
issn = "0960-9776",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does receiving high or low breast cancer risk estimates produce a reduction in subsequent breast cancer screening attendance? Cohort study

AU - French, David P.

AU - McWilliams, Lorna

AU - Howell, Anthony

AU - Evans, D Gareth

PY - 2022/5/5

Y1 - 2022/5/5

N2 - Risk-stratified breast cancer screening may improve the balance of screening benefits to harms.We assess a potential new harm: reduced screening attendance in women receiving below average-risk (false reassurance) or higher-risk results (screening avoidance). Following initial screening, 26,668 women in the PROCAS study received breast cancer risk estimates, with attendance recorded for two subsequent screening rounds. First-screen attendance was slightly reduced in below-average (85.6%) but not higher-risk women, compared to other women (86.4%). Second-screen attendance increased for women at higher-risk (89.2%) but not below-average, compared to other women (78.8%). Concerns about this potential harm of risk-stratified screening therefore appear unfounded.

AB - Risk-stratified breast cancer screening may improve the balance of screening benefits to harms.We assess a potential new harm: reduced screening attendance in women receiving below average-risk (false reassurance) or higher-risk results (screening avoidance). Following initial screening, 26,668 women in the PROCAS study received breast cancer risk estimates, with attendance recorded for two subsequent screening rounds. First-screen attendance was slightly reduced in below-average (85.6%) but not higher-risk women, compared to other women (86.4%). Second-screen attendance increased for women at higher-risk (89.2%) but not below-average, compared to other women (78.8%). Concerns about this potential harm of risk-stratified screening therefore appear unfounded.

M3 - Article

JO - The Breast

JF - The Breast

SN - 0960-9776

ER -