Does Mode Matter? Measuring the Effects of Different Types of Online Political Engagement on Offline ParticipationCitation formats

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Does Mode Matter? Measuring the Effects of Different Types of Online Political Engagement on Offline Participation. / Cantijoch Cunill, Marta; Cutts, David; Gibson, Rachel.

In: Comunicação, Mídia e Consumo, 2018.

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@article{054f632f8c16473b984b5daafdc87ec4,
title = "Does Mode Matter? Measuring the Effects of Different Types of Online Political Engagement on Offline Participation",
abstract = "Recent studies have shown that online participation is a multi-dimensional phenomenon that replicates and extends existing forms of political engagement. What is less clear is the mobilizing potential of these different types of activity and particularly whether they trigger offline participation. This paper addresses these questions in an analysis of citizens online and offline behaviour in the context of a UK General Election. Specifically we identify three different modes of online engagement in the campaign, profile the individuals most likely to engage in them, and examine whether they affected individuals’ likelihood of voting. Our findings show that while newer social media based ‘e-expressive’ activities are most likely to appeal to those individuals who are not already engaged in politics they do not necessarily increase the likelihood of voting. By contrast higher consumption of news and information online during an election does appear to significantly boost individuals’ chances of turning out to vote.",
keywords = "Online participation, Digital media, Voting, Mobilisation, Election campaign",
author = "{Cantijoch Cunill}, Marta and David Cutts and Rachel Gibson",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.18568/cmc.v15i43.1616",
language = "English",
journal = "Comunica{\cc}{\~a}o, M{\'i}dia e Consumo",
issn = "1806-4981",
publisher = "Escola Superior de Propaganda e Marketing",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Mode Matter? Measuring the Effects of Different Types of Online Political Engagement on Offline Participation

AU - Cantijoch Cunill, Marta

AU - Cutts, David

AU - Gibson, Rachel

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Recent studies have shown that online participation is a multi-dimensional phenomenon that replicates and extends existing forms of political engagement. What is less clear is the mobilizing potential of these different types of activity and particularly whether they trigger offline participation. This paper addresses these questions in an analysis of citizens online and offline behaviour in the context of a UK General Election. Specifically we identify three different modes of online engagement in the campaign, profile the individuals most likely to engage in them, and examine whether they affected individuals’ likelihood of voting. Our findings show that while newer social media based ‘e-expressive’ activities are most likely to appeal to those individuals who are not already engaged in politics they do not necessarily increase the likelihood of voting. By contrast higher consumption of news and information online during an election does appear to significantly boost individuals’ chances of turning out to vote.

AB - Recent studies have shown that online participation is a multi-dimensional phenomenon that replicates and extends existing forms of political engagement. What is less clear is the mobilizing potential of these different types of activity and particularly whether they trigger offline participation. This paper addresses these questions in an analysis of citizens online and offline behaviour in the context of a UK General Election. Specifically we identify three different modes of online engagement in the campaign, profile the individuals most likely to engage in them, and examine whether they affected individuals’ likelihood of voting. Our findings show that while newer social media based ‘e-expressive’ activities are most likely to appeal to those individuals who are not already engaged in politics they do not necessarily increase the likelihood of voting. By contrast higher consumption of news and information online during an election does appear to significantly boost individuals’ chances of turning out to vote.

KW - Online participation

KW - Digital media

KW - Voting

KW - Mobilisation

KW - Election campaign

U2 - 10.18568/cmc.v15i43.1616

DO - 10.18568/cmc.v15i43.1616

M3 - Article

JO - Comunicação, Mídia e Consumo

JF - Comunicação, Mídia e Consumo

SN - 1806-4981

ER -