Disinhibited attachement disorder in UK Adopted children during middle childhood: prevalence, validity and possible developmental originCitation formats

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Disinhibited attachement disorder in UK Adopted children during middle childhood: prevalence, validity and possible developmental origin. / Kay, Catherine; Green, Jonathan; Sharma, Kishan.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 44, No. 7, 10.2016, p. 1375-1386.

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Kay, Catherine ; Green, Jonathan ; Sharma, Kishan. / Disinhibited attachement disorder in UK Adopted children during middle childhood: prevalence, validity and possible developmental origin. In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 44, No. 7. pp. 1375-1386.

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@article{aa0433f1b6a6436fa403316b75774a99,
title = "Disinhibited attachement disorder in UK Adopted children during middle childhood: prevalence, validity and possible developmental origin",
abstract = "We investigate the prevalence, specificity and possible aetiology of Disinhibited Attachment Disorder (DAD) in adopted children without a history of institutional care. Sixty children adopted from UK out-of-home care (AD; mean age 102 months, 45 {\%} male); 26 clinic-referred children with externalizing disorder (ED; mean age 104 months, 77 {\%} male) but no history of maltreatment or disrupted care; and 55 matched low-risk comparison controls (LR; mean age 108 months, 49 {\%} male) were assessed for DAD using a triangulation of parent, teacher, and research observations. Maltreatment history and child psychiatric symptoms were obtained from parent report and child language development was assessed. DAD was identified in 49 {\%} of AD, 4 {\%} of ED and 6 {\%} of LR children. Seventy-two percent of AD children had suffered maltreatment. DAD was not associated with degree of risk exposure, demographics, or language. A significant association with ADHD did not explain variance in DAD prevalence across groups. DAD was significantly more common in children first admitted to out-of-home care between 7 and 24 months, independent of maltreatment severity, age at adoption and number of care placements. Implications for developmental theory, adoption policy and clinical application are discussed.",
author = "Catherine Kay and Jonathan Green and Kishan Sharma",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1007/s10802-016-0131-2",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "1375--1386",
journal = "Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology",
issn = "0091-0627",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disinhibited attachement disorder in UK Adopted children during middle childhood: prevalence, validity and possible developmental origin

AU - Kay, Catherine

AU - Green, Jonathan

AU - Sharma, Kishan

PY - 2016/10

Y1 - 2016/10

N2 - We investigate the prevalence, specificity and possible aetiology of Disinhibited Attachment Disorder (DAD) in adopted children without a history of institutional care. Sixty children adopted from UK out-of-home care (AD; mean age 102 months, 45 % male); 26 clinic-referred children with externalizing disorder (ED; mean age 104 months, 77 % male) but no history of maltreatment or disrupted care; and 55 matched low-risk comparison controls (LR; mean age 108 months, 49 % male) were assessed for DAD using a triangulation of parent, teacher, and research observations. Maltreatment history and child psychiatric symptoms were obtained from parent report and child language development was assessed. DAD was identified in 49 % of AD, 4 % of ED and 6 % of LR children. Seventy-two percent of AD children had suffered maltreatment. DAD was not associated with degree of risk exposure, demographics, or language. A significant association with ADHD did not explain variance in DAD prevalence across groups. DAD was significantly more common in children first admitted to out-of-home care between 7 and 24 months, independent of maltreatment severity, age at adoption and number of care placements. Implications for developmental theory, adoption policy and clinical application are discussed.

AB - We investigate the prevalence, specificity and possible aetiology of Disinhibited Attachment Disorder (DAD) in adopted children without a history of institutional care. Sixty children adopted from UK out-of-home care (AD; mean age 102 months, 45 % male); 26 clinic-referred children with externalizing disorder (ED; mean age 104 months, 77 % male) but no history of maltreatment or disrupted care; and 55 matched low-risk comparison controls (LR; mean age 108 months, 49 % male) were assessed for DAD using a triangulation of parent, teacher, and research observations. Maltreatment history and child psychiatric symptoms were obtained from parent report and child language development was assessed. DAD was identified in 49 % of AD, 4 % of ED and 6 % of LR children. Seventy-two percent of AD children had suffered maltreatment. DAD was not associated with degree of risk exposure, demographics, or language. A significant association with ADHD did not explain variance in DAD prevalence across groups. DAD was significantly more common in children first admitted to out-of-home care between 7 and 24 months, independent of maltreatment severity, age at adoption and number of care placements. Implications for developmental theory, adoption policy and clinical application are discussed.

U2 - 10.1007/s10802-016-0131-2

DO - 10.1007/s10802-016-0131-2

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 1375

EP - 1386

JO - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

SN - 0091-0627

IS - 7

ER -