Discrimination, anti-prejudice norms and public support for multicultural policies in Europe: the case of religious schoolsCitation formats

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Discrimination, anti-prejudice norms and public support for multicultural policies in Europe: the case of religious schools. / Blinder, Scott; Ford, Robert; Ivarsflaten, Elisabeth.

In: Comparative Political Studies, 2019.

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@article{13468d326a984fd496ebf75eda44e7a0,
title = "Discrimination, anti-prejudice norms and public support for multicultural policies in Europe: the case of religious schools",
abstract = "This study examines public support for a key contested multicultural policyin contemporary Europe: the provision of religious schools. It makes twomain contributions, one substantive and one theoretical. Substantively, themain contribution is to provide new experimental evidence demonstratingthe existence of discrimination against Muslims on a central issue ofmulticultural social policy. Theoretically, the main contribution is to proposean explanation for variations in patterns of discrimination that highlights therole of individuals’ motivation to control prejudice. Through moderationanalysis, we show that individuals who express stronger motivation tocontrol prejudice are more likely to treat Muslim and Christian requests forreligious schools equally, and they are more likely to retain their supportfor Muslim schools in the wake of a threatening Islamist terrorist incident.Because we conducted the experiments in three countries, we in additionfind societal-level patterns of variation: Individuals’ motivation to control prejudice is more strongly associated with nondiscriminatory responsesto the question of religious schools where a more multicultural path ofaccommodation has been pursued. This societal-level variation raises newhypotheses about how multicultural policies may interact with public opinionand underlines the importance of comparative experimental work.",
author = "Scott Blinder and Robert Ford and Elisabeth Ivarsflaten",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1177/0010414019830728",
language = "English",
journal = "Comparative Political Studies",
issn = "0010-4140",
publisher = "Sage Publications Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Discrimination, anti-prejudice norms and public support for multicultural policies in Europe: the case of religious schools

AU - Blinder, Scott

AU - Ford, Robert

AU - Ivarsflaten, Elisabeth

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - This study examines public support for a key contested multicultural policyin contemporary Europe: the provision of religious schools. It makes twomain contributions, one substantive and one theoretical. Substantively, themain contribution is to provide new experimental evidence demonstratingthe existence of discrimination against Muslims on a central issue ofmulticultural social policy. Theoretically, the main contribution is to proposean explanation for variations in patterns of discrimination that highlights therole of individuals’ motivation to control prejudice. Through moderationanalysis, we show that individuals who express stronger motivation tocontrol prejudice are more likely to treat Muslim and Christian requests forreligious schools equally, and they are more likely to retain their supportfor Muslim schools in the wake of a threatening Islamist terrorist incident.Because we conducted the experiments in three countries, we in additionfind societal-level patterns of variation: Individuals’ motivation to control prejudice is more strongly associated with nondiscriminatory responsesto the question of religious schools where a more multicultural path ofaccommodation has been pursued. This societal-level variation raises newhypotheses about how multicultural policies may interact with public opinionand underlines the importance of comparative experimental work.

AB - This study examines public support for a key contested multicultural policyin contemporary Europe: the provision of religious schools. It makes twomain contributions, one substantive and one theoretical. Substantively, themain contribution is to provide new experimental evidence demonstratingthe existence of discrimination against Muslims on a central issue ofmulticultural social policy. Theoretically, the main contribution is to proposean explanation for variations in patterns of discrimination that highlights therole of individuals’ motivation to control prejudice. Through moderationanalysis, we show that individuals who express stronger motivation tocontrol prejudice are more likely to treat Muslim and Christian requests forreligious schools equally, and they are more likely to retain their supportfor Muslim schools in the wake of a threatening Islamist terrorist incident.Because we conducted the experiments in three countries, we in additionfind societal-level patterns of variation: Individuals’ motivation to control prejudice is more strongly associated with nondiscriminatory responsesto the question of religious schools where a more multicultural path ofaccommodation has been pursued. This societal-level variation raises newhypotheses about how multicultural policies may interact with public opinionand underlines the importance of comparative experimental work.

U2 - 10.1177/0010414019830728

DO - 10.1177/0010414019830728

M3 - Article

JO - Comparative Political Studies

JF - Comparative Political Studies

SN - 0010-4140

ER -