Direct neural evidence for the contrastive roles of the complementary learning systems in adult acquisition of native vocabularyCitation formats

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@article{b77ebc3b83334cc181cbd506ed947220,
title = "Direct neural evidence for the contrastive roles of the complementary learning systems in adult acquisition of native vocabulary",
abstract = "The Complementary Learning Systems (CLS) theory provides a powerful framework for considering the acquisition, consolidation and generalisation of new knowledge. We tested this proposed neural division of labour in adults through an investigation of the consolidation and long-term retention of newly-learned native vocabulary with post-learning functional neuroimaging. Newly-learned items were compared to two conditions: (i) previously known items to highlight the similarities and differences with established vocabulary; and (ii) unknown/untrained items to provide a control for non-specific perceptual and motor-speech output. Consistent with the CLS, retrieval of newly-learned items was supported by a combination of regions associated with episodic memory (including left hippocampus) and the language-semantic areas that support established vocabulary (left inferior frontal gyrus and left anterior temporal lobe). Furthermore, there was a shifting division of labour across these two networks in line with the items{\textquoteright} consolidation status; faster naming was associated with more activation of language-semantic areas and lesser activation of episodic memory regions. Hippocampal activity during naming predicted more than half the variation in naming retention six months later. ",
author = "Katherine Gore and Anna Woollams and Steffie Bruehl and Ajay Halai and {Lambon Ralph}, Matthew",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1093/cercor/bhab422",
language = "English",
journal = "Cerebral Cortex",
issn = "1047-3211",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct neural evidence for the contrastive roles of the complementary learning systems in adult acquisition of native vocabulary

AU - Gore, Katherine

AU - Woollams, Anna

AU - Bruehl, Steffie

AU - Halai, Ajay

AU - Lambon Ralph, Matthew

PY - 2021/12/7

Y1 - 2021/12/7

N2 - The Complementary Learning Systems (CLS) theory provides a powerful framework for considering the acquisition, consolidation and generalisation of new knowledge. We tested this proposed neural division of labour in adults through an investigation of the consolidation and long-term retention of newly-learned native vocabulary with post-learning functional neuroimaging. Newly-learned items were compared to two conditions: (i) previously known items to highlight the similarities and differences with established vocabulary; and (ii) unknown/untrained items to provide a control for non-specific perceptual and motor-speech output. Consistent with the CLS, retrieval of newly-learned items was supported by a combination of regions associated with episodic memory (including left hippocampus) and the language-semantic areas that support established vocabulary (left inferior frontal gyrus and left anterior temporal lobe). Furthermore, there was a shifting division of labour across these two networks in line with the items’ consolidation status; faster naming was associated with more activation of language-semantic areas and lesser activation of episodic memory regions. Hippocampal activity during naming predicted more than half the variation in naming retention six months later.

AB - The Complementary Learning Systems (CLS) theory provides a powerful framework for considering the acquisition, consolidation and generalisation of new knowledge. We tested this proposed neural division of labour in adults through an investigation of the consolidation and long-term retention of newly-learned native vocabulary with post-learning functional neuroimaging. Newly-learned items were compared to two conditions: (i) previously known items to highlight the similarities and differences with established vocabulary; and (ii) unknown/untrained items to provide a control for non-specific perceptual and motor-speech output. Consistent with the CLS, retrieval of newly-learned items was supported by a combination of regions associated with episodic memory (including left hippocampus) and the language-semantic areas that support established vocabulary (left inferior frontal gyrus and left anterior temporal lobe). Furthermore, there was a shifting division of labour across these two networks in line with the items’ consolidation status; faster naming was associated with more activation of language-semantic areas and lesser activation of episodic memory regions. Hippocampal activity during naming predicted more than half the variation in naming retention six months later.

U2 - 10.1093/cercor/bhab422

DO - 10.1093/cercor/bhab422

M3 - Article

JO - Cerebral Cortex

JF - Cerebral Cortex

SN - 1047-3211

ER -