Cretaceous arachnid Chimerarachne yingi gen. et sp. nov. illuminates spider origins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • External authors:
  • Bo Wang
  • Jason A Dunlop
  • Paul A. Selden
  • William A. Shear
  • Patrick Müller
  • Xiaojie Lei

Abstract

Spiders (Araneae) are a hugely successful lineage, with a long history. Details of their origins remain obscure, with little knowledge of their stem group, and few insights into the sequence of character acquisition during spider evolution. Here, we describe Chimerarachne yingi gen. et sp. nov., a remarkable arachnid from the mid-Cretaceous (approximately 100 million years ago) Burmese amber of Myanmar which documents a key transition stage in spider evolution. Like uraraneids, the two fossils available retain a segmented opisthosoma bearing a whip-like telson, but also preserve two traditional synapomorphies for Araneae: a male pedipalp modified for sperm transfer and well-defined spinnerets, resembling those of modern mesothele spiders. This unique character combination resolves C. yingi within a clade including both Araneae and Uraraneida, however, its exact position relative to these orders is sensitive to different parameters of our phylogenetic analysis. Our new fossil most likely represents the earliest branch of the Araneae, and implies that there was a lineage of tailed spiders which presumably originated in the Palaeozoic and survived at least into the Cretaceous of South-East Asia.

Bibliographical metadata

Original languageEnglish
JournalNature Ecology & Evolution
Early online date5 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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