Communism and the LawCitation formats

Standard

Communism and the Law. / Gorlizki, Yoram.

The Oxford Handbook of European Legal History. ed. / Heikki Pihlajamäki; Markus D. Dubber; Mark Godfrey. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2018. p. 1095-1114.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Gorlizki, Y 2018, Communism and the Law. in H Pihlajamäki, MD Dubber & M Godfrey (eds), The Oxford Handbook of European Legal History. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 1095-1114.

APA

Gorlizki, Y. (2018). Communism and the Law. In H. Pihlajamäki, M. D. Dubber, & M. Godfrey (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of European Legal History (pp. 1095-1114). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Vancouver

Gorlizki Y. Communism and the Law. In Pihlajamäki H, Dubber MD, Godfrey M, editors, The Oxford Handbook of European Legal History. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2018. p. 1095-1114

Author

Gorlizki, Yoram. / Communism and the Law. The Oxford Handbook of European Legal History. editor / Heikki Pihlajamäki ; Markus D. Dubber ; Mark Godfrey. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2018. pp. 1095-1114

Bibtex

@inbook{251f27f72f6d425ea92d16d4ae5b80a6,
title = "Communism and the Law",
abstract = "In the early twentieth century Russia embarked on one of the most radical legal experiments ever undertaken in a modern state. The essay begins by describing Bolshevik ideas on law and their role in shaping the new legal order. It then moves on to examine the close fit between this legal order and the three institutional pillars of socialism: undivided rule by a Leninist party, a predominance of state ownership of productive property, and a top-down system of bureaucratic coordination. These pillars gave Soviet law its most distinctive characteristic: a tendency for agencies of justice to be subsumed within an overarching system of central management, with its own rhythms and laws of motion. After the Second World War the system of socialist law was transplanted to Eastern Europe. The essay concludes by examining efforts to reform the socialist legal system and by considering its legacy today.",
keywords = "Communism, Socialism, Law, ideology, Russian Revolution, Socialist Law, legal experiments",
author = "Yoram Gorlizki",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780198785521",
pages = "1095--1114",
editor = "Pihlajam{\"a}ki, {Heikki } and Dubber, {Markus D. } and Godfrey, {Mark }",
booktitle = "The Oxford Handbook of European Legal History",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Communism and the Law

AU - Gorlizki, Yoram

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - In the early twentieth century Russia embarked on one of the most radical legal experiments ever undertaken in a modern state. The essay begins by describing Bolshevik ideas on law and their role in shaping the new legal order. It then moves on to examine the close fit between this legal order and the three institutional pillars of socialism: undivided rule by a Leninist party, a predominance of state ownership of productive property, and a top-down system of bureaucratic coordination. These pillars gave Soviet law its most distinctive characteristic: a tendency for agencies of justice to be subsumed within an overarching system of central management, with its own rhythms and laws of motion. After the Second World War the system of socialist law was transplanted to Eastern Europe. The essay concludes by examining efforts to reform the socialist legal system and by considering its legacy today.

AB - In the early twentieth century Russia embarked on one of the most radical legal experiments ever undertaken in a modern state. The essay begins by describing Bolshevik ideas on law and their role in shaping the new legal order. It then moves on to examine the close fit between this legal order and the three institutional pillars of socialism: undivided rule by a Leninist party, a predominance of state ownership of productive property, and a top-down system of bureaucratic coordination. These pillars gave Soviet law its most distinctive characteristic: a tendency for agencies of justice to be subsumed within an overarching system of central management, with its own rhythms and laws of motion. After the Second World War the system of socialist law was transplanted to Eastern Europe. The essay concludes by examining efforts to reform the socialist legal system and by considering its legacy today.

KW - Communism, Socialism, Law, ideology, Russian Revolution, Socialist Law, legal experiments

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780198785521

SP - 1095

EP - 1114

BT - The Oxford Handbook of European Legal History

A2 - Pihlajamäki, Heikki

A2 - Dubber, Markus D.

A2 - Godfrey, Mark

PB - Oxford University Press

CY - Oxford

ER -